Monday, 4 December 2017

Little Curl

This blog is now available as an mp3 podcast through the link: www.ferngladefarm.com.au

The American poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, once penned a short poem about a rather naughty young lady, who had a little curl in the middle of her forehead. As a child, I’d always believed that the poem was a nursery rhyme and not something written by a celebrated poet.

The first stanza of the poem is as follows:

“There was a little girl,
Who had a little curl,
Right in the middle of her forehead.
When she was good
She was very very good,
And when she was bad she was horrid”

It is not only little girls with little curls that can act horridly. Lately, there seems to be an awful lot of high profile men in the media (both here in Australia and also in other countries like the US) who have been apparently behaving rather horridly.

In my life I have encountered many people who have acted horridly in a range of ways. And generally most of those people were known to me. The weird thing is that when I was a young kid, people were obsessed by “stranger danger”. There was this inference that strangers (people who are unknown to you) were clearly bad people, not to be trusted, and avoided at all costs. Now as far as I understand human relationships, the average person can cope with knowing about 150 other people. There are about 7 billion people on the planet. Some rough maths tells me that 7 billion minus 150, means that there are a lot of strangers on this planet. Clearly anyone who feared so many other people would be suffering from a state of high anxiety.

Many long years ago, I did come across a horrid person, who was also my boss. As such he was not a stranger! The job interview should have rung alarm bells, particularly when the interviewer stressed that the job would be challenging. Of course I was young and dumb, and wanted to make my name and so I replied enthusiastically that I was indeed looking for a challenge. I could see thoughts churning away in their mind which more or less said: “This is our man / sucker!”

It goes without saying that challenges are indeed challenging, and this business was in a real mess. The mess was of truly epic proportions and I had never seen anything like it before or since, and hope never to see such a thing again in my life.

Slowly, however I restored order from the chaos.

The boss was an odd bird in that he would equally praise me and then criticise my work whilst imploring me to better efforts. The criticisms were often profound and remarkably insultingly personal. I had never had exposure to such a verbal technique before, and because I was young and dumb, I tried harder and worked ever longer hours. The hours extended into late nights and soon weekends. The work was unrelenting and so too were the ongoing criticisms.

Eventually, the editor broke the spell by asking the simple question: “What the (naughty word beginning with F that rhymes with the word truck) is going on?” I could not adequately explain the situation, and given that there appeared to be no end point in sight we decided that it would be best if I walked away from that job. It is worth remembering that things could always get worse!

I scored another job pretty much straight away, and I was shocked to my core by how normal and nice the new employment situation felt. I was like the frog in the slowly boiling water in that I had not realised how hot the water I was in had become. The strangest thing of all is that the entire experience had been created through the misuse of words.

Some people are bound to repeat situations. Others learn from past mistakes and then go on to make new and different mistakes. That is part of life! After that experience I spent time trying to learn about and understand the motivations of these horrid people. For example, they may or may not have little curls, but they certainly tend to use a few verbal and physical techniques.

My belief in this situation is that prevention is better than a cure. I would have appreciated it, if as a child, adults in my life had warned me to beware of horrid people, doing horrid things, and prepared me on how to respond to those people. Instead they were all about 'stranger danger', and so I had to learn my lessons the hard way. My reading of the recent media accounts appears also to be the same surprising journey that a lot of other people have taken.

The week began with some very hot weather. Most days the temperature exceeded 35'C (95'F). The Bureau of Meteorology issued a severe weather warning for the area for a storm beginning on Friday and extending through into Sunday. The weather went from stonking hot to really wet over a few short days.

With the severe weather warning in mind, the editor and I began ensuring that all of the drains were cleared of any detritus. Water collects on hard surfaces such as roads, and huge volumes of water can cause a lot of damage. The farm uses drains to collect water from the road and then channels the water into swales where it can infiltrate into the soil. We began ensuring that the drains worked by clearing them of any and all detritus:
A concrete pipe along the road channels water into a swale at the top of the shady orchard
This is the other side of the above drain. The swale slows water giving it time to infiltrate into the soil
Along the road at the very top of the sunny orchard a channel along the road directs water into a pit. That channel was widened and cleared to ensure that it worked during heavy rain.
A channel along the road directs water into a concrete pit
Even the fern lined concrete pit is sort of attractive!
The concrete pit links to a pipe that takes water under the road. That water then exits into the fern gully at the very top of the property above the sunny orchard. The plants and soil in the fern gully serve to slow the movement of water and allow it to infiltrate into the ground.
A pipe from the pit directs water under the road and into the fern gully
The fern gully is really starting to get well established this season and it is as beautiful as it is as functional.
The plants and soil in the fern gully slows water allowing it to infiltrate into the soil
Water can do a lot of damage very quickly. Last January the drain along the road (the first two photos above) failed - i.e. filled up with a detritus dam causing water to flow where it doesn't normally flow. The huge volume of water then washed away part of the steep garden bed behind the house. We had never experienced a landslide here before and have now made many changes to ensure that this does no occur again. One of those changes is depositing a huge quantity of composted woody mulch above the steep garden bed. Into that mulch we have planted a hedge of Agapanthus and other plants. Agapanthus have very thick and complex root systems and hedges of the plants have held together well in other parts of the garden.
An Agapanthus hedge has been planted above the house in very deep composted woody mulch
In very hot weather, I added a half cubic metre (0.65 cubic yards) of composted woody mulch into the recently planted vegetable / tomato enclosure. The mulch will assist with stabilising the soil and absorbing water during the heavy rain.
A half cubic metre (0.65 cubic yards) of composted woody mulch into the recently planted vegetable / tomato enclosure
I also began mowing the shady orchard. After a couple of hours and many litres (gallons) of sweat, the mower broke down and could not be restarted. I have to admit to a mild feeling of relief when the mower broke down.
Mowing the shady orchard began this week
In case I hadn't worked enough this week, the tree dudes arrived and I got them to cut a huge fallen branch into firewood lengths. The branch had fallen many months ago and I hadn't got around to that job. Despite the rain over the past few days, the leaves all burned off rapidly and with great heat.
A massive fallen branch was cut into firewood lengths by the tree dudes

Then on Friday, the rain arrived. At times the air was still hot and the torrential rain had me feeling as if I lived in a tropical rainforest.
The rain on Friday was torrential and the heat reminded me of the experience of a tropical rainforest
Even Mr Poopy had had enough of the rain and just wanted back inside the house!
Let me in! NOW!
On Friday afternoon, the rain ceased for a brief while. Then thick cloud rolled in over the mountain range. Then the rain began in earnest and it just continued raining all day Saturday and into early Sunday. It was an impressive storm!
Thick cloud rolled in from the south
On Sunday, the rain was no longer continuous. This time, the rain came in waves and we'd get a brief respite before the next wave of rain arrived.
On Sunday, the rain arrived in successive waves
Fortunately, it appears that so far, not much of the fruit is showing damage. Here is a sample of some of the produce from this week:
Cherries. It is a race to harvest the fruit before the birds get them!
Blueberries are ripening rapidly
The thornless blackberries in the enclosure are prolific. Don't count the blackberry jam before the harvest!
We've begun turning the broadbeans into bean salad. Tasty stuff!
The technical word as to the interaction between heavy rain and flowers is: Squooshed. However, never fear! There are still plenty of flowers for the blog photos:
The herb bed is looking good and this yellow flower on a huge stem has a few friends and they're putting on a good show

The mysterious Canary Island plant is now surrounded by feral carrots and onions
How amazing is this passionflower?
A bit of rain can't keep a good Pyretherum down
The Poppies have also responded well to the rain
The temperature outside now at about 8.15pm is 9’C (48’F). So far this year there has been 924.0mm (36.4 inches) which is more than last week’s total of 840.8mm (33.1 inches).

55 comments:

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Margaret,

I haven't quite gotten around to Kombucha yet! By all accounts it is meant to be a very tasty drink, and the SOCBY's are a fascinating beastie. I'm beginning to feel that my chickens food could benefit from additions of fermented food products. The other day we cooked up a batch of millet and left it overnight to mildly ferment - and the chickens went feral. A fight is a good way to describe their excitement. The weather went from so hot to so cold that the chickens needed a bit of a boost.

I'm onto the third batch of backslopped yoghurt and it appears to be working well and getting better with every batch. It is a fascinating lore and I knew very little about that aspect of fermentation despite having made yoghurt for over a decade.

No worries, the book is epic and covers a huge diversity of food products I can well understand your point of view. I utilise the book by interspersing it with other books.

Yes, that is an excellent idea! We are using a cross of bacteria from Greek and Bulgarian yoghurts. If it was a dog it would be called a bitsa (bit of this and a bit of that)! The editor and I don't quite understand what ultra pasteurized milk is but we believe it may be called "Ultra Heat Treated" down here. The supermarket chains appear to be not very excited by fresh milk...

Enjoy your warmer weather!

I had to laugh about the washing machine, because to get at the serial numbers and register the warranty, I have to uninstall the machine... I didn't quite notice that instruction in the manual. Oh well...

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

How did the Shelton adventure turn out? Did you score any special items? I do hope the weather held for you as those are far out cold mornings! Brrr! Did the fog lift at all? The past weekend here was exceptionally humid and foggy and drizzly for a couple of days... Would you believe that I have the wood heater happily burning away tonight. Crazy stuff when it was hovering around 100’F last week.

I'll be very interested to hear how your garden goes over the less cold than your last years experience. Are you enjoying your new digs? And how is the jaw going these days? Sad to say it, but peas are fair weather friends. I've never seen Elephant garlic, but apparently it is a variety of leek. Did you know that with leeks, you can just chop them at ground level, leaving the roots in the soil and they'll regrow again the next season? I have a few of them that do that every year. I do hope you've tried the very tasty potato and leek soup?

Oh, that's not good on so many fronts. I guess initially, the products were very good quality and reasonably priced, but over time things changed. I can't see how things produced at a factory and then shipped and stored can be cheaper than stuff I can do here with basic raw materials. It just makes no sense at all, so it probably makes no sense. Unless of course, something is different and the two products are not commensurate?

That happened here too, and the free to air station that served up Star Trek Voyager just dropped it like a hot potato before the series had even finished. In those days, there was not an alternative to be had. The local video shop was years behind the station. And, they had been running Star Trek at that weirdly late time on a Tuesday night for well over a decade. Exactly, the stations may have forgotten that audiences have to be nurtured and grown - nowadays they expect them to simply turn up out of nowhere based on hype. A lot of things are like that and I see it playing out in the area of professional sports too.

Yes, you are very perceptive as that was my take on the gentleman too. It is a more than a great place though, if you can handle the ambience which is not for everyone. A lot of people these days would be scared by the ambience as it is not all glass and chrome. I feel as if I have somehow stepped back in time there and it bustles and jostles in a friendly way.

Exactly, muffins are sometimes mini cakes (like a mini-me - that is an Austin Powers reference - what a film!) Well, loafs are loafs and pies are pies, but mileage may vary. When I was a kid it was quite common to consume a nut loaf, which is a cylindrical fruit cake which always had a brandy base with various nuts in it. It was quite tasty and the brandy meant that it kept fresh for quite a long while. People don't have much feel for food preserving methods these days and I wonder if that will change over time - probably not as it takes a long time to learn and whether they put the effort in is a question I can’t answer.

Really? Maybe I hang in different circles, but they generally know what mead is. I would have thought that Game of Thrones put mead back on the map again? It is not a cheap drink though as beer can significantly undercut the price due to cheaper raw materials. I quite like mead, but it doesn't make much economic sense to consume it regularly. This is also why beekeepers feed their bees sugar syrup (sugar is cheap relative to honey). I'm very old school on that front and refuse to feed them sugar syrup as they have so many flowers to forage from.

Thanks for the correction. It is complex living here in the future you know! :-)! Do they do a carols by candlelight thing in the parks?

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

Hello Chris

I also thought that the girl with the little curl was a nursery rhyme, so thanks for the info.

The words 'stranger danger' didn't exist when I was a child. We were so much more feral and like wild animals we were wary. I would ask my mother if I was unsure about someone whom we knew and she was great about telling one the truth.

I do think passion flowers are exotic and beautiful. Have been watching Blue Planet II and discovered that the name for a baby puffin is puffling. That has to be the sweetest word that I have ever heard.

My landline copper cable will never be improved, I am far too rural, so have to be resigned to regular fails.

It has warmed up enough for me to work outside and now I am feeling very tired. Icy cold weather is due to return shortly.

It is a long time since we have had continuous serious rain and I do wonder how the 2 neighbours building their homes will find it. One house is externally finished but they haven't moved in yet; the other one has the upper floor being started. I consider that all progress has been incredibly slow.

Inge

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - "adult ... warned me to beware of horrible people doing horrible things..." Well, yes, but ... would you as a young person have listened? :-). Hmmm. I've worked for a few psycho bosses, but organizations? Hmmm. None come to mind. Parts of organizations ... one restaurant out of a chain. A library or two out of a regional system. But then, I've always been a bit restless, maybe, and having no real obligations, could either craft a job to my liking, or take a walk. Lucky me.

Ferns do dress up a landscape! :-). Your rain was feral! That one picture where it's hard to see the trees in a bit of distance due to the downpour. We have that here, from time to time. I'm glad all your prep payed off and you didn't get washed off your hillside. And that most of your fruit rode out the storm. The cherries are really pretty and it looks like you'll get a bumper crop of blueberries. Here, the high tech term is smooshed, instead of squooshed :-).

It's interesting how the pyretherum looks to be part of the daisy family. As the chamomile looks to be part of the daisy family. But, I don't think I'd want to try a cup of pyetherum tea! Odd how some plant families (I suppose like human families) have wonderful members, and other members that can be quit unpleasant or lethal. The nightshade family comes to mind. Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. You mentioned yogurt to Margaret as being "back slopped." So, it's kind of like sourdough? Like having a pet around that needs to be tended and nurtured? :-)

The trip to Shelton was AOK. Not a drop of rain, going or coming back. But, it looked pretty threatening. I just kept telling myself, "You're a lucky guy, it won't rain." :-). And, it didn't. So, I walk in the place, and there right in front of me, is something called a "side by side." Drop front desk, three drawers underneath and a bit of glass doors and display shelves on both sides. A bit of deco trim, but not over the top. I measure it, it fits the alcove. Pretty much solid oak. But I'm asking myself what are the chances that I'm going to go with the first piece of furniture my eyes fall on? Pretty good, actually. It's sitting in my entry alcove, now.

I mean, the place was pretty overwhelming. Probably 200+ pieces of furniture of all descriptions, falling within certain perrameters. Mostly, oak. Mostly from the 1920s and 30s. Rows up drop front desks, rows of desks with glassed doors above, rows of dressers and sideboards. Clutches of corner cabinets. Gaggles of occasional tables. For the entry way, I kept gravitating back to the side by side, and looking for a small display cabinet. There were plenty. But, oddly, most had deco tops and chippendale or queen anne feet. Weird. I finally found a little fellow with a nice bit of deco fretwork on the front glass and acceptable feet. Quit plane, actually.

Sky, the crunchy old hippie, helped me load at that end, Steve, helped me unload at this end. I could handle everything pretty much on my own, except getting the side by side off my truck. Oak is heavy! But with the handy two wheeled cart, no problem maneuvering it into my apartment. So am I done with furniture shopping? I think so. But there are a few spaces ... :-)

Leeks, shallots, chives ... it's all onions to me :-). I really need to experiment more with those and pay more attention to subtle differences (to me) in flavor.

Does "ambience" equal a certain amount of "grunge." Or maybe, one person's ambience is another person's grunge? :-). I make no bones about needing a certain amount of grunge in my life. The places, the people. Far more interesting. To me.

Oh, if this new "anti-waste" trend takes off, food preservation may become more important ... or, at least, more wide spread. I think the general economy has a lot to do with it.

I never went to the tree lighting in the park, but could hear the carols from blocks away. With small band, heavy on the brass :-). I don't know. Here, carols or Christmas music starts so early and is so all prevassive (prevasive, privassive ... well, you get the idea. It's everywhere.) that I really don't care for it much at all. Overdone and kind of manipulative. To "put you in the holiday spirit" (to overspend.). Lew

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Inge,

It is quite amazing to me that such a rhyme would have such an interesting pedigree. Life can be surprising.

Your mothers strategy was exactly what I was suggesting in the essay. Common sense useful advice tempered with experience and learning. It is not much to ask for, but there you go. I often feel that youth are sent into the world ill equipped to deal with the encounters they find there. It is a make or break strategy and it doesn't really need to be that way. One of the things I am enjoying with Mr Kunstler's World Made by Hand book series is the many interesting social interactions where people are forced to negotiate the murky waters of humanity when there is nobody to run to.

Puffling is a really sweet word! Sure beats a murder of crows! Thank you.

Yeah, that is one of the reasons I never went to the expense of connecting up to the copper cable on the street. Someone "in the know" also once mentioned to me that there was a likelihood that a connection at the exchange may not have been available. Many years ago, and I can't for the life of me remember who it was, but they made me laugh when they suggested that the water authority would go to the expense of bringing mains water and sewerage up here... I couldn't believe the belief they had in that outcome.

It is funny how we fit in work around the weather. I get tired too, so respect to you for getting out there and getting into it! The presently accepted work arrangements of 5 day weeks and inflexible hours regardless of the weather or sunlight are quite strange from a historical perspective.

Oh yeah, yours is a maritime climate so heavy continuous rain is a serious concern and it will be interesting to see how your neighbours go if that circumstance eventuates. I feel that the neighbours here took the recent severe weather warning less seriously than the editor and I. They amused me because as the editor and I encountered them whilst we were working, they made an amusing suggestion that the editor had married badly in that she had to work alongside me. What are you meant to say to that?

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

You make a strong argument about not listening to adults, and well I did sort of do my own thing anyway, as the adults in my life appeared to be mildly out of control and not worth placing my trust in. That alone hones a person. At one time and for a short while I had a step dad that was a cliché of an angry Irish dude. He was a bad apple that one.

A few years ago I read a delightful suggestion that: "A fish rots from the head" and the workplace in question appeared to me to be either run by ruthless business folk or crims. Honestly, it depended on the day, and after a year or so, I'd had enough. It is funny that you write that, but I feel very similar. A long time ago the son of very a wealthy bloke asked me why I didn't have a mobile phone - and I replied: "Because I'm free". He looked more confused than troubled, but there you go. I used to help him with his business and not talk down to him as other people did - I spoke to him as if he was another person and we got along alright. I sort of felt for him a bit as he copped a lot of flak from other people but he was basically OK.

Thank you and I really enjoy how the fern gully is coming along. After a decade or so, it will spread outwards and into the forest. Ferns are really interesting and archaic plants and the remnants of the rainforest here are often in competition with the eucalyptus species. I feel for the underdog and give them a leg up when I have the energy to do so. I sometimes fancy that I'll find one of the old folk living under one of the ferns one day.

I had a complex day today and spent about 40 minutes out in the orchard this evening with Mr Poopy and the chickens. I scored a few of the remaining ripe cherries and a good handful of mulberries. Yum! I'm trying to train Mr Poopy to become accustomed to the chickens so as to help me with the fox. The chickens tell me that they want to consume Mr Poopy, so it is a complex process and may take a year or so.

Thank you for the additional word of smooshed! It is a good word, but perhaps not as good as: Puffling!

Chamomile is a tough plant to grow because it became out-competed by the other plants on the several occasions that I planted German Chamomile as a ground cover. Oh yeah, Pyrethrum tea would leave a lot to be desired. Not good. Nightshade plants are an interesting bag of plants aren't they? The Aboriginals reputedly and in the very early days of white settlement, had a good trade in various Solanum family plants as they were highly prized fruits. Like your Opossum’s, they reached South America via the super continent of Gondwanaland. It brings to mind how phosphate poor the old soils of this continent actually are and the plants reflect that lack. I wonder how many folks think about such limitations?

cont...

Fernglade Farm said...

Exactly! Yeah, I have a little pet yoghurt that now lives in the refrigerator and produces very delightful yoghurt. The most recent batch was the best so far, so things are on the up. Now there has been a very long story to the yoghurt saga. It was awkward, but I had to sack the editor from the position of chief yoghurt maker and stage a take over coup of that operation. The editor has some serious training in industrial food microbiology, but the yoghurt batches were failing because the diversity of bacteria was too low and my gut feeling (no pun intended) was that a macrophage (a virus that attacks certain specific bacteria) had evolved in the kitchen and the batches were failing - not all the time, but enough of the time that it became a nuisance. It was reading the book Aurora that alerted me to the possibility, and so I dumped everything and went right back to basics, with a little temperature controlled assistance in the cooking process, and recreated what went on a long time ago. You can understand that I had to tread very carefully, but also at the same time act. I am nothing if not diplomatic. Talk about murky waters. :-)! The pet yoghurt only needs to be restarted every seven to ten days, but I suspect that one could go much longer, but you may have to dig deeper.

Well done you for scoring the "side by side" and you know sometimes things just work out like they are meant to work out! That happens. Years ago, I had the chance to purchase a Victorian era table and it had the most beautiful carved legs each of which ended in an eagles talon gripping a globe. The legs were lovingly hand carved from a solid piece of hardwood too. Such work is rarely seen these days, but alas I was broke and had to walk on... I’ll bet that has happened to you too?

The question I have for you is: whilst acknowledging that the display cabinet should be well made and look good, should the display cabinet look better than the contents?

Sky is a very cool name which you don't hear much anymore. Did Sky have any interesting anecdotes to recount? We all get crusty as time goes on, so we have to ensure that we are still having fun! Oak is heavy, because the grain is so dense. One must keep ones eye open as you never know what the space may demand for itself. The farm here unfolds like that, so beware! :-)!

Fair enough and that is pretty funny about the onions. Good stuff. You know, I plant onions in the garden and just let them do their thing, but I too should pay more attention to their life-cycles. I once amused folks at a stand at a festival all day long by handing out free walking onions and telling their story. I'm not sure how much good it did, but hopefully some of those bulbs have sprouted elsewhere.

Grunge is generally a good thing. I make a habit of never attending high end dining establishments as not only would I feel vaguely uncomfortable, but also I would feel like I was faking it, and I prefer to feel grounded. Many years ago the editor and I used to frequent a hamburger joint which served excellent food, but far out it was a dive, but also remarkably charming and colourful at the same time. I was recounting to someone about that place earlier in the week and they looked unconvinced.

I reckon you are spot on about the War on Waste. It has made an impact, albeit minor. I hope nobody cottons on to the inherent value in my coffee grounds. They may not be able to go the distance though. ;-)!

Oh my! Things are a bit different down here and carols in a park will usually only be heard once in any year in most locations. I saw something on a film once about carol singers in the UK and that seemed quite strange to me as they appeared to be shaking down folks for loose change so that they went away (2003 film Love, Actually).

Cheers

Chris

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - "Not listening to adults." Well, guilty, here. :-). Of course, the undeveloped young brain always (sometimes? Often? Sweeping generalization?) thinks it knows best. Or, maybe it's that it hasn't learned to differentiate between "adults worth listening too" and "adults whose opinions are rubbish." :-). "Live and learn" is an old saw. The living part can be tricky. Some of the stunts I pulled and situations I got into ...

Are the "old folk" who may take residence under your ferns the Australian version of "the little people?" Perhaps garden gnomes are called for? :-).

Yup. If Mr. Poppy stands still long enough, I'm sure the chickens will give him a taste.

The thing about "poisonous" plants is that they're poisonous for some people, and maybe not for others. In small amounts, some can be really good purges or tonics. Clean out the old pipes :-). Not that I'd mess around with those, unless under the direction of a Master herbalist or botanist. Or had VERY trustworthy instructions. In the documentary "Footprints" they talked a bit about the yellow (?) walnuts, you have, which are poisonous. But somehow, the original peoples of Australia figured out a three day song and dance (I think there may have been actual song and dance involved) to render them edible. One fellow thought the end result was rather bland, but "the old folks like them." Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. Claw and ball foot. Often associated with Chippendale style. I wouldn't say he invented it, but he sure popularized it. All of wood. But around 1890 - 1920 (tale end of the Victorian style ... into Edwardian) I often see a brass shank and claw wrapped around a glass ball. I most often see them, oddly enough, on piano stools. The one's that you can give the seat a good spin to raise or lower it. Wood is most often oak, but can also be mahogany, or even cherry wood. I've also seen them on small occasional tables. Rarely, on big horking pieces of furniture.

Oh, I can walk away from most stuff pretty easy, if I think the price is outrageous. It usually signals to me, that the seller really doesn't know what they're doing. Or, have initially paid too much for an item, and are trying to recoup their investment. Law of previous investment, and all that. Sometimes I think, "Do you know where you are?" (as in, rural Lewis County ... not some high end East Coast store). Or, "Do you want to sell it, or be buried with it?" I try not to pay more for something I can find on E-Bay. It's part of the market, now. One has to price with an eye toward on-line. Also, there's a lot of tat, out there. And, most collectible stuff was pretty much mass produced. If one is patient ... waits, the item might pop up somewhere else at a more reasonable price.

If as display case is fancier than the tat it holds, perhaps it's time to upgrade your tat? :-). Of course, you cluster tat for greater impact. Then there's cultural attachments to items. A ratty old woven sandal in a fancy case may look a bit odd. Until you find out the sandal is 15,000 old.

Well, I figure Sky either named himself, or, he's of an age when he might have been raised by feral hippies. :-). Every year our local newspaper puts out an issue in the new year, where they list and have pictures of every baby born in Lewis County during the previous year. Rather boring, visually. You seen one baby ... :-). But the names! I save them, just because they're so bizarre or entertaining. Of course, in this part of the world, parents seem to go heavy on religious names (the more obscure the better ... not many plane old Matthew, Mark, Luke or John) or names with a "country western singin' star" slant. When taking library card applications I finally learned to assume nothing and asked people to spell (or write on an application) their names. It's all quit mad.

I really didn't get to swap stories, much with Sky. We were too busy shuffling furniture around ... finding a key that fit the side by side, loading the truck in a manner that I might make it home with a piece of furniture and not kindling wood. There weren't what I'd call a lot of people in the store, but enough that Sky's time was in demand. Lew

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

The idea that the editor had made a bad marriage because she had to work beside you, is utterly incredible. My husband and I frequently worked together; far from being bad it actually makes for a great relationship. Of course we quarrelled but that's fine. Unlike today when the first squabble seems to result in the end of togetherness.

Inge

Pam in Virginia said...

Hi, Chris!

I thought the Girl with the Little Curl was a nursery rhyme, too.

I never had a horrible boss, but both my husband and I have had relatives who were quite horrible.

You have a lot of drains around the place; that's a lot of work. We only have ones along the neighborhood dirt road and my husband keeps those cleaned out. I don't know why we haven't washed away. Mother Nature must be helping out.

What is the difference between shady orchards and sunny orchards? None of our fruit trees will do anything but sulk in the shade, so "shady orchard" seems like an oxymoron.

Mr. Poopy: Your day may have been cloudy, but you certainly brightened mine! Hi, Toothy! That is neat to see the cloud hanging so low, not like fog, but just a low cloud. We have our winter view over the valley to the Blue Ridge Mountains now that the leaves have fallen.

I'm glad that you have found a use for the broad beans. I think we'll have to try growing some. Maybe I should plant them when I plant peas? Or only in the autumn?

The tall yellow flower looks like mullein. We have some growing wild near the barn. It is a biennial and will set seed the second year. You still have many beautiful flowers in spite of the storm.

What a dirty trick that is to put your washing machine's serial# where it can't be readily accessed. I'll bet some horrible boss made them do it. How do you like how it operates, so far?

Will you be seeing Christmas decorations soon? Yay for Christmas decorations! I'll be putting up my lights soon. When I was in town yesterday there was a fellow collecting for the Salvation Army (a legitimate charity) and he was playing beautiful music on a trumpet. I could hear him from quite far away and it was very nice.

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Inge:

"Puffling" is a word to treasure. Thanks!

Pam

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis, Inge, and Pam,

Many thanks for the lovely comments, however I am unable to reply this evening and promise to reply tomorrow.

Lewis - Life intrudes! This intrusion took the form of parrots eating all of the strawberries in the new enclosure. The editor spotted about eight of them sitting on the steel fence rail a few days ago just watching for any poor unfortunate strawberries that were not even close to being ripe. Anyway, to cut a long story short, I travelled into the big smoke today to pickup enough steel to create a roof over the new strawberry enclosure. I can't imagine that I'll get any strawberries from the new enclosure this season. Mind you, I patched up the holes in the old enclosure and have harvested some tasty berries. The old enclosure is a serious fail though and it is only a matter of time before the wallabies destroy the netting. Life is very perilous here for strawberries... I'll make the roof over the Christmas break.

It is a short work month for me as most businesses close after Christmas for a few weeks so I have to work tonight to make up for the trip this morning... I'm pretty sure I must have done something very bad in a past life! :-)!

Cheers

Chris

Pam in Virginia said...

Chris:

Have just informed my son that we may need a roof over the strawberries. Am keeping an eye out for parrots and wallabies.

Pam

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Parrots! Taste like chicken :-). Ah, Christmas. When normal life slows to a crawl or stops entirely. Because everyone else it nuts. Bah! Humbug! Unforeseen pitfall to living in The Home. Christmas cards have been appearing on my door. Now, I feel obligated. But I'll hold the line! Also, a terrible mistake has been made! There's no money in any of them! See John Grishim's book, "Skipping Christmas."

Speaking of chickens, my friend Julia told me that about a month ago, two hens joined her flock. From, who knows where. Given that people often dump dogs and cats on her road, I'd guess that either someone in town couldn't keep them, anymore. Or, just got tired of them. She said they're quit handsome birds, and before her hens took the winter off, quit good layers. Breed unknown.

Continuing The Cheahlis / Australian International Film Festival, I watched "Looking for Grace", last night. It's a drama, so no happy endings. Basically, it's about a young lady who makes some very bad choices. She must be reading this blog. Of course, some of the adults don't make very good choices, either. A fairly good movie, that told the story from different characters point of view. There were some bits of business that didn't make much sense. And, no subtitles. So, I missed a bit, here and there.

I also watched episode one of "Preacher", season two. The opening scene? A great car chase with cool explosions and lots of bloodshed. Set to the tune of "Come on, Eileen." :-). That song does pop up in the oddest places. Hope the old boys who originally performed it are still racking a bit in.

Ran to the Safeway, this morning, and had to scrape ice off all my windows. Cold and clear. Lew

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

Well adults and the media do spend quite a lot of conditioning youth’s brains by saying that “things just ain't so” as Mark Twain once astutely quipped. And there is the nub of the problem, learning via more direct methods can be quite tricky and involve risks that folks seem keen to want to avoid. It is a problem that. Mate, I survived too and have also caused my fair share of mayhem. Where do you reckon the middle ground is in all of that? My gut feel is that Inge's experience was closest to the middle ground? A lot of young adults embark on a journey into the world and they have troubles assessing risk, but risks are inherently risky by their very nature. Of course, somewhere you have to learn how to learn and how to approach problems and difficult situations whilst weighing up the probabilities of complex situations arising and then how to handle those. Dunno. There is enough meat in there for a book! The book of common sense, chapter one, verse one! Hehe!

Yeah, the old folks could be the little people, and certainly I reckon the fern gully would be a good place for them. Personally, my understanding of that lot is that inevitably it means bad news for whomever stumbles across their path. I'm a bit dubious about the garden gnome because someone may steal it and then send me photos of the gnome off enjoying itself in some far flung and exotic location. I'm not saying that I would be envious of the gnomes adventures, but well, a bit of that may come into play. And who needs such emotions in their life? :-)!

The chickens are cheeky enough to peck at me from time to time, so Mr Poopy is fair game. I keep him on a short leash, but the whole experience is like television for him as he is fascinated by the chickens. It might take a year or so before I can trust him with the chickens. I mucked up because I started his training too late in his life and I underestimated the sheer sneakiness of the fox. Have you ever had to battle it out with a fox before?

I'd never even heard of an indigenous yellow walnut before! There are some very interesting plants up north in the tropical rainforests. I spotted a reference about an Australian cashew nut. The plant world is a massive place. There are two Macadamia trees growing here and they are so far outside their natural range that it is not funny. Oh! Speaking of all things tropical, the Bureau of Meteorology has called a La Nina over the past few days after much prevarication, and it apparently extends for the next three months and although it is a weak La Nina, it is associated with warm and humid air for this corner of the continent. That is good news for me for summer. There are big fires in California…

It is interesting to me that the Edwardian styles were replicated in your country. Like, from a cultural perspective I would have thought that the US would have forged ahead with its own styles? Dunno, I assume that the Art Deco styles which arose during the 1920's originated in the US? There is a bit of Art Deco down here too and you can see it in buildings, although there are not that many in existence due to the rapid onset of the Great Depression. Some of the house styles and furniture during those days were pretty fundamental. Down here there is a suburb of them and if my memory serves me, they were called bank houses as the banks initially got them constructed. Garden City, Victoria. I used to work up the road from this suburb and to be honest I found the area to be uninspiring despite the idealism that went into its design. Let's see if there are any images of the housing stock... Depression-era home fetches almost $2 million after auction. The auctioneer appears to be rather well fed. :-)!

cont...

Fernglade Farm said...

I guess your experience sort of gets back to people believing what they want about an item which may not be in accordance with the reality of the item or the location. You know, most times when I decide to sell something, I tend to put it up for auction for one cent and you know it gets what it gets. A lot of the items I sell are often obscure items and I have no idea what they're worth and what other people will pay for them. It is a different strategy to be sure, but you know, I am selling the item and so that is the goal. People can get hung up on prices and far out, I walk away from those situations because if it is too much, like you say, it just won't sell.

A very clever observation about the tat case!

You are going to love this article: 'Mafia No Fear' a no go, but 'Number 16 Bus Shelter' OK: New Zealand releases banned baby names list. Enjoy as it is unbelievable. :-)! Sorry, there was a pop up ad on this website that I could not seem to block... It seemed harmless enough, but noisy.

Who doesn't enjoy a good 'bah humbug!' every now and then? Tough economic times are clearly leading to tough economic measures. I still do Christmas cards, but I'm a bit old fashioned like that - but I reckon people love receiving them.

I can't believe people would dump hens that are on the lay. You know, I have heard of people dumping roosters rather than bumping them off and eating them. Julia has scored a good few hens and they may be a heritage or bitsa breed?

No happy endings seems to be a bit of a thing with Australian films, and Looking for Grace appears to be no exception to that rule. Making poor choices may be part of the culture down here, who knows? :-)! Oh well...

That is a delightful song and it is a real earworm. I read something a while back about tempo and volume changes in music being quite catchy. One of the longest serious pedigree rock bands going around today (Foo Fighters) use that softly, then loudly style. It is quite good, but may not be to everyones taste?

A bit of rain about tonight. I'm going to have to get out and brush cut the orchard as there may be the odd triffid or three hiding in there now. The grass is too tall even for the long legged Mr Poopy! At least the weather is a bit cooler now which is a relief.

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Inge,

Exactly! People believe such strange things and I really can't be bothered correcting people who disagree with me. It leads to a life of conflict after all, and people stake their claims and one of those is that 'physical work is bad' and the unstated assumption is that I am a poor provider. The editor is very happy with the situation and enjoys the work.

That is so true. You really have to negotiate how to work together and it is not always smooth sailing. When I first left the corporate world I had to learn that I was not indeed the boss, but fortunately I am a quick learner! I needed to be! Hehe! Hey, what sort of techniques did you use to work together?

At the beginning of each work day, someone is allocated to be the boss of the job and make the necessary calls. Then we talk through what is required for the job and who is going to do what and how. The process has served us very well. It requires a level of honesty about what is possible though, but we know each other pretty well by now and don’t try to overdo things.

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Pam,

I thought so too! The rhyme has an impeccable pedigree. :-)!

You are very lucky not to have had that experience and may you never experience it. On the other hand that is sort of the same situation. The consistent thing is where other people use a leverage over you for their benefit (and the benefit can be rather unusual as some people just like causing discomfit in others).

Very funny! Well, I have not shown all of the drains either. There are some half foot diameter drains which I use in other parts of the property. The frogs like them for the cool they enjoy over summer. Speaking of which I hope that you are safe from fire for the season? What a year you are having in your part of the world. I do hope that Mother Nature continues to smile on your corner of the planet. We need all the help we can get. It is very wise of your husband to keep the drains clear of detritus. Do you find yourself checking the weather forecast on a regular basis? One of the things that surprised me was that many folks I spoke to in Melbourne seemed oblivious or even blasé about the recent heavy rain forecast?

The shady orchard is on the western end of the property and gets the morning and midday sun and the sunny orchard is on the eastern end and gets the morning, midday and afternoon sun. Apples and Pears dominate the shady orchard! It gets sun, but less than the other one, and not much hot summer afternoon sun. I'm not sure what fruit trees would do well in full shade. Dunno. They would certainly sulk here too. I have a peach in the shady orchard and it looks the same to me as it did five years ago. I may move it during winter. Dunno.

Mr Poopy and Mr Toothy send their happy tail wagging greetings! :-)! Yeah, the fog was pretty dense and low, but it still rained heavily and then just drizzled for almost 24 hours... That is La Nina for you... Nice to read that your view has returned with the deciduous trees. It is nice to be able to see off and away into the distance.

I haven't found that there is much difference between autumn and spring planting of broadbeans. They tend to not grow much over winter anyway, so it is more like they're not dying, but neither are they growing. It would be interesting to hear if you have any different results in your part of the world? They're tasty in a three bean salad.

Thanks for the flower suggestion, but the leaves look a bit different to me. Greener and not as furry looking. The flowers are spot on though. It might be a variation. I saw some white flowers in the same plant earlier this morning in someone elses garden in the area.

Thanks for asking and the machine is pretty good and spins faster than the old model, but we are wondering if the faster spinning may damage the clothes? The editor contacted the manufacturer who let us in on the secret that just inside the door are the serial numbers. I see a flaw in the instruction manual!

Hopefully next week! I can report that I was rather disappointed with the Magical Christmas Unicorn as despite having a single glass I had a hayfever reaction to it which may indicate a heavy hand in the preservative department... They may be secret Christmas grinches?

I hope you get your lights up soon! I like Christmas lights as they are very cheery.

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

I love receiving Christmas cards too.

I am trying to think how my husband and I worked together. Have come to the conclusion that we just did; no discussion! Perhaps the fact that we both had common sense helped and we knew the areas in which the other had greater strengths. I like the idea of 'A book of common sense'.

Have just read that 16 to 24 year olds are having mental health problems as a result of being called 'snowflakes'. I don't know whether or not the writer realised that this proved the point!

Windy and pouring with rain outside. Actually I needed some rain; I was reduced to doing a bit of watering the other day which is ridiculous in Winter.

Vaguely remember some comment about cutting off leeks at ground level so that they re-grow the following year. I am puzzled by this as so much of the leek is below ground and they grow easily from seed anyhow. Seems a waste of the best of the leek.

Inge

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Lew:

Our Dollar Tree store has decent boxes of 12-14 Christmas cards for $1.00 and individual cards for $.50- $1.00. Also, second hand shop carry quite a few sometimes, though they've probably been picked over by now.

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

Chris:

No fires here in my part of the world and we just had a lovely rain.

I check the weather forecast every morning, looking at the forecast for 5 days ahead. I think, maybe, that people who have no daily working connection with nature - or an outdoor athletic one (including walking and biking) - don't notice the effects of the weather so much except as to how it affects them getting from one indoor space to another.

When thinking of shady orchards I had forgotten about your intense UV rays - we so rarely get that here. But I don't get how they are so much more intense where you are, as didn't we decide once that the spot where I live and your home are about equidistant from the equator? It is the earth's tilt, perhaps? In late winter I am chopping the heads off of our two ten-year-old peach trees. They are such stinkers and that is very unkind of me to say as they obviously do not get the tender loving care that they deserve, but I am tired of having to baby so many things. Phooey!

Thanks for the broad bean info. My first 2018 seed catalogue just came. Oh, boy!

My washer has a "low" setting for the spin cycle.

My, goodness - catastrophe! What could have happened to the Magical Christmas Unicorns? A sacred ritual already turned to dust?

Pam

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - A picture of your kidnapped garden gnome with a case of Christmas Magic Unicorn ale? :-). That would hurt.

There don't seem to be many foxes here. You don't hear about them, very often. I wonder if the coyotes keep the population down? I can't ever remember seeing one. Not once. Julia couldn't quit pin down what breed the chickens are. They hybridize so freely. I don't know if you've ever gone on line to try and figure out what a mystery chicken is, but it's maddening. Even within established breeds, you get a lot of variation.

The fires in S. California are quit something. No lose of life. Speculation is that after the death toll in N. California, people are taking evacuation orders a bit more seriously. Well, that will last a season ... They asked some expert of one kind or another about the fires and climate change. I've finally figured out a good take on the current narrative. Now, I'm reaching deep within the old memory bank, but it seems to be "One rose does not a summer make." How many roses do you need to make a hedge?

Art Deco. If it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck ... I know it when I see it? :-). It was a French exposition in the 1920s that kicked off the movement. Those French. Always kicking off movements. Different countries seemed to do different variations on a theme. With lots of overlap. But you can kind of see two main themes. A repetitive organic/floral pattern with a hard edge (top of The Chrysler Building) and another theme that was all about speed and modernity. Think chrome toasters from the 30's or big horking train engines from the same period. There was a little design trick called "speed lines" which evoked movement. Cubist? Industrial? Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. I watched "Dawson City: Frozen Time." About the recovery of all those old silent films. There were about 350 films that exist in no other copies. There were a lot of "news of the world" bits, too. Dawson was the end of the distribution chain. A lot of movies didn't get there until 3 or 4 years after they were produced. Dawson had a rather novel method of garbage disposal. They'd put stuff on the ice of the Yukon River, just about the time it started to flow again in spring. When the ice broke up, it was "out of sight, out of mind." Great piles of nitrate film also made for cheery fires on the river beach.

The films that survived were used as fill in a swimming pool to ice rink conversion. Then the building burned down, sealing them in. Chance. Pure chance.

I read the introduction to "The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter" (Sax, 2016). Interesting stuff. I'll get to your links, later, as I'm going to try and pull myself together and get out and get a flu shot, today. Lew

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Inge,

Glad to hear. Sometimes I reckon it is the little things in life that make big impacts socially and Christmas cards are one of those things. Having said that, I bet get onto writing and sending them! :-)!

Fair enough and after a couple of decades you do get to know the strengths and weaknesses of your partner. We are pretty easy going with each other on the review side of things too, and as part of our professional work, we have to review each others work, so the "do unto others" rule applies! It is also important too to recognise that as an individual you can't be over everything and so you have to let go of some areas and just hope for the best. Of course if things go off the rails, you can step in and provide assistance.

It would be funny if that book of common sense were ever to be written! Maybe it is something we just have to learn as we go? Dunno!

Ouch! The kids aren't stupid and they know the world that they are entering is a complex and troubled place. I feel that the lessons that the kids need to survive are not being taught to them. Mental health issues often arise - and I'm not suggesting that this is the case here as that would be a gross simplification of the problems - when the world that they experience differs from the world that they are taught to expect. Nobody was anxious when I was a teenager, it just didn't happen. Even the mere fact that parents are looking for an edge for their kids whilst pushing them, tells me that the world they expect the kids to go into is not so good. That isn't the story that they tell the kids though.

Wow! You did have a dry summer and I'm surprised that the dry weather has extended for so long.

Fair enough about the leeks. It is probably more of an indication of my slack techniques with the leeks! Hehe! They do self seed readily. I reckon the terrace I construct above the not yet constructed grape terrace should be an onion terrace? Dunno.

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Pam,

Great news about the rain in your part of the world. I hope it had a chance to soak into the ground? I once recall the end of a hot and dry summer a few years back and the rain washed a lot of soil around the place. I try to keep all soil covered in vegetation those years, even if the vegetation is dead.

Those fires in California don't look so good: California fires: 200,000 evacuated as hurricane-strength winds threaten to whip up inferno.

Same here, except we get seven days forecast for weather (100'F next Wednesday) and five days for the rainfall forecast map. Yeah, absolutely! I hadn't thought about it in those terms, but yeah - too true!

I just checked the latitude guide and we are about the same. 37.5'S here and you are about 38'N. The weird thing is because I'm at altitude, I get a 1 degree allowance for each 100m above sea level, so it is a cool climate here (that is a relative concept though). So I share a similar climate to the very bottom of the island of Tasmania which is 44'S. On the other hand, UV is just more extreme here in the southern hemisphere for some weird reason. Anyway, for the next few months, UV will be rated as extreme (tomorrow is rated at 11) and the fruit trees in the shady orchard appreciate the break in the afternoon sun when the UV is at its worst. Peach and nectarine trees love the heat and sun... Here is a short article on the matter: Why Tasmania's sun feels harsher during the summer months. The sun here can bite hard and burn skin even though the air temperature is cool and it may be the difference which makes the situation that much harder to adjust to.

Go hard and prune those peach trees! Pruning feeds the soil and gives the tree a bit of a break. I'd lend you some wallabies to prune your fruit trees, but they may escape! Then there would be accusations and unpleasantness. I don't really know much about pruning but just sort of go with my gut feeling and see what may be best for the tree.

Go the seed catalogues. What to purchase is an important question!

The low setting is not a bad idea. On this machine that low setting is 800rpm, but then it does 1200rpm and a very crazy 1400rpm (which we are disinclined to use).

Oh yeah, that brew be nasty. I'll make some gentle inquiries next time I'm at the pub. I'll be diplomatic and sensitive by asking the question: "What happened?" Hehe! Expect a report in the next week or so! :-)!

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

That would hurt too. I like how your mind works though! :-)! Far out, the gnome may be better equipped to handle this year’s batch of Unicorns. I am soft, and to be honest, I felt quite ill last Saturday morning, but you carry on and I slowly recovered during the day. It was not a hangover as I hadn't consumed that much, but it sure felt like one. Anyway, I would not have wanted to miss the Green Wizards, so stiff upper lip and all that old chap! Hehe!

Of course, I'd forgotten about the coyotes. That makes sense as the foxes won't stand up to the dogs here. Not that long ago, dingoes (which are basically coyotes as far as I can tell) used to roam the forests. The dingoes arrived by way of Indonesia and they displaced the Tasmania Tigers and Devils on the mainland.

Well remember that Chicken People film we discussed a while back? The film referred to a book titled: American Standard of Perfection. Now of course in the real world, I'm worried about more practical matters such as personality, longevity and robustness of the chicken, whilst the book is perhaps concerned with other matters. It is maddening though, so yeah, you have no argument from me. Actually, I have a chicken here who is named "fluffy head" and my best guess is that she is an Australorp / Silky cross but you know I have no idea at all. It isn't a bad idea to cross breed chickens anyway because a few of the chickens that I have purchased over the years have displayed signs of inbreeding. Long term I'm going to have to consider breeding chickens. Anyway it is probably not a bad idea to keep a second chicken enclosure just for emergencies (such as a tree falling on the main enclosure and squashing it).

That story reminds me of the story of the King Charles Spaniel. At one point in their history, there were only six of the dogs remaining and all of the current stock, descend from those six dogs. Now, I’m not suggesting that that is a bad idea, but my mates dad once remarked to me in later years that they’d owned one of those dogs many long years ago and it was the stupidest dog that he had ever known.

Yeah, those fires are something aren't they, and I would have thought that cooler weather would be prevailing in that part of the world now? I posted a news article link to them in the reply to Pam above. That happens here too with preparations and evacuations, but over time the seriousness of the concern dwindles. It is not usually far from my mind, and I'm working on preparations, but the job is big and I tackle what I can when I can. The entire thing annoys the daylights out of me, because it simply does not have to be that way, but because of the sheer stupidity of the laws, it happens here again and again – and every time it happens everyone is surprised. How could this possibly be? Far out…

cont...

Fernglade Farm said...

Don't you reckon risk is a strange thing for us humans to ponder and respond to? And we are trained from an early age to disregard some risks and overstate others. I don't feel that such training does us any good. In response to your observation / question, the word "accretion" pops into my consciousness. I reckon the problem is like barnacles growing on the bottom of a hull in that the population of barnacles can build up, but sooner or later, you may have to deal with them.

Mate, that is so true. The eye sees "Art Deco" and the brain acknowledges the analysis. There is something in what you say about the "speed lines" as many of the buildings that I describe that way display more simple lines than the more fussy Victorian and the notably less fussy Edwardian architecture. Plus the materials used in those constructions were different. I note the use of steel in windows in Art Deco rather than the timber used in Edwardian or Victorian. Plus there was the use of rendered buildings to give smooth flat lines. I have often wondered whether the architecture represents the wider economic circumstances? What do you reckon about that? I wonder what the current constructions say about economics? For some reason the word "puffery" springs to mind! Dunno what that means though! Hehe!

Wow. I have no idea what else to say. When film canisters containing films that survived nowhere else, are used as fill for a swimming pool to ice rink conversion. Wow. I wonder how our recorded culture will be viewed in years to come? Possibly not good. Were any treasures discovered in amongst the 350 recordings?

Well, it is interesting that some new releases are now released on vinyl as well as CD's and streaming services. There is a small but concerned group hooked into that medium, although what it will come to is an interesting question. My gut feel is that solid instruments with spare reeds, strings etc. are probably the best bet for the future, plus the skills to use them. I will be interested to hear if the influential band: "The White Stripes" are mentioned in that book? Mr Jack White has a preference for analogue recording methods. Incidentally, their biggest hit "Seven Nation Army" was apparently written at the Corner Hotel in Melbourne where they were set to play that evening.

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

I am another one who never uses the 1400 spin cycle only the 1200. Probably the reason that my washing machine has endured so well.

The dog Wren is stealing the neighbour's shoes and socks. He was good hearted about it and said not to tell my son but I have told him.

Inge

margfh said...

Hi Chris,

I've been blessed to have mostly good bosses overall. Hey I was even a boss twice - office manager of small businesses. One of my early bosses was the comptroller of a small music distributor. He promoted me to full charge bookkeeper and taught me much over my time at that particular job. When I was teaching there was a succession of principals. Some good and some not so much. The last principal was a horror though and her name was Margaret too. One of the secretaries thought I should change my name to Maggie to differentiate between us but I would have none of that. In fact I referred to myself as Margaret the First. The principal did not see the humor in that when she inadvertently heard me referred to in that way.

It would seem weird to be so hot during the Christmas season though at least you don't worry about snowstorms impacting travel.

Was successful making yogurt with the milk I bought from the farmers market.

I planted chamomile in the garden and it self seeded each year. For about 5-6 years it mostly stayed under control but a couple of years ago it went, as you would say, feral and was everywhere. I did harvest the blossoms for tea which was time consuming but I enjoyed just watching the variety of pollinators attracted to it. Interestingly the honey bees seldom visited.

It's gotten quite cold here but at least no major storms in the forecast. Doug and I are driving in toward the city to see our granddaughters in a play. There is some light snow forecasted around the time we'll be driving home around 9:30 though and it can be close to a two hour drive.

Finally had a showing of the house this week. Turned out it was an older couple kind of like us so of course the house was too bit. Our realtor didn't know why theirs even bothered to show it. We are going to take the house off the market for a couple months as there's been basically no activity and probably wouldn't be during the holidays and worst of the winter.

Margaret

Pam in Virginia said...

Chris:

Thanks so much for the 2 articles; they were both excellent. I had only seen bits of news on the California fires; they are way worse than I thought. So, it is this: " the higher the sun in the sky, the higher the UV" that is the reason - at least, mostly - for your intense UV rays. I feel for poor Jo in Tasmania! And Chris and the editor up on their mountain!

Pam

margfh said...

@Lew and Chris

For many years our Christmas cards were pictures of our animals decked out in holiday attire. When we started there weren't digital cameras so we would just shoot a roll of pics with our inexpensive camera and pick out the best one. They became quite the hit. One year one of our turkeys injured a leg badly so we were going to have to butcher him a little early. We put a little wreath around his neck and put him in a roasting pan (alive) decorated with sprigs of evergreens and that was our card for that year. Yes rather sick and tacky but no one seemed offended. After all one doesn't get an opportunity like this often. After many years I just got tired of addressing all the cards and told Doug if he wanted them to have at it. I would help him set up for the pictures but that was it. He lasted a couple of years at that job.

For a few years he sent out a family letter as many do but really not that much exciting happens in our lives so that's out too at least for now.

Some cards/ letters I really enjoyed but the ones that are just signed or better yet are printed with the signatures are just meh.

My mother had a book with columns where she kept track of who she sent to and received card from. If someone didn't send for two years in a row they were off the list. Part of this was professional as my father was a physician though.

When we were sending out our animal cards some friends would say how much they enjoyed them but they themselves didn't send cards and we understood. My MIL would only send cards to people she didn't personally see.

I do think this practice is not nearly as common as it used to be though now we get e-cards for Christmas.

Margaret

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ Pam - Well, cards or no cards isn't really a economic issue. My relationship with the holidays is ... complicated :-). I've been staying out of the lobby, here at the home as I finally figured out that all the holiday tat feels ... oppressive. Maybe it's partly because I think holidays should be a private thing? Or, LOL, maybe I just feel people should keep their holiday nonsense to themselves? Or, maybe it's my horror of incurring obligations? And this time of the year, obligations seem to come at you left and right, weather you want to take them on, or not. I'm sure years of intensive psychotherapy could figure it all out. :-). Lew

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - I think the "speed lines" were kind of a hoot. Yup, that chrome toaster was going to fly right off the kitchen table! Art Deco was all about movement, speed and modernity. New materials, or new uses for old materials. Interesting things were done with metal and glass. Was it a matter of cost? I think, maybe that was the next step. The completely, form-follows-function, stripped down brutalist architecture that came next.

Deco could be pretty pricey and lux. Think of Hollywood in the 30's. Jean Harlow boudoirs and other interiors. Even high end perfume bottles had that cubist geometric look. Later copied by more down scale producers. I think South(?) Miami Beach has a lot of art deco buildings. It's even been declared a historic district. I think Frank Lloyd Wright's LA cast concrete buildings (the one's that look, to me, like Mayan temples. Hollyhock House, etc.) are really an expression of Art Deco. I guess to be a style, it's got to permeate to all corners of a culture. Besides architecture and the afore mentioned perfume bottles, it impacted everything from jewelry to women's fashions. Very angled looking and structured.

Were there treasures among the Dawson City films? Hmmm. While watching the documentary, I had the thought that I really didn't see any, what I would call, "important films." But that depends on what one considers "important." There was a Charlie Chaplin film, but it wasn't clear if the Dawson copy is the only copy. I could swear I've seen it before, but, maybe only stills or small clips? There were some films by a woman director, who made hundreds of films and the Dawson films are the only remainder. Footage of Klondike Kate, that exists nowhere else. And, a few other people who later went on to become important in Hollywood. But mostly in non acting ways. Some of the newsreels were pretty interesting. Labor unrest. The bombing of Wall Street (date escapes me.). World War I footage.

The nitrate film was a real problem. That stuff would burst into flames if you looked at it wrong. There was a pretty early, safer film stock, but it was expensive. Even when whole studios burned down, they didn't switch to it.

Got my flu shot, this morning. Since I'm living "in community", it's the socially responsible thing to do. Went to the auction last night. Got everything I went after. A Delft ceramic wall pocket shoe. Another Chinese sewing basket. The highlight? A pair of cast iron bookends, sailing ships with company name and date of 1929. Cool. Lew

LewisLucanBooks said...

PS: I just got an e-mail from my buddy Scott. His sister is in the path of one of the S. California fires. It's 10 miles, away. Been ordered to evacuate. Will she leave or will she dither? Lew

LewisLucanBooks said...

PPS: The first chapter of the book on analog is about vinyl. I see by the index that Mr. Jack White will have a lot to say :-). After hitting a low point in 2010, vinyl is making a comeback. Big time. Record pressing factories are banging along, 24/7 and new ones are opening. Record stores are opening left and right and the one's that are open are showing 20% increases, per year. But the author thinks it's odd that most of the media is still churning out a lot of pap about the "death" of vinyl. I suppose it makes better copy :-).

So, why? The author explores some pretty complex societal reasons. For himself, he likes the idea of having an actual library of music that he can see and touch. And, although he doesn't say it, perhaps show off to other people? He also feels it gives importance and respect to music, that you don't find in a bunch of 1s and Os, floating around out in The Cloud, somewhere. As to why younger people are rediscovering vinyl, he seems to think it's, maybe, partially, a case of "whatever your parents aren't doing." :-). Lew

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Inge,

A sound philosophy! Yup, just because machines can go flat out like a lizard drinking, it does not mean that they should be run flat out. :-)! I do try to be very gentle on the machines here and also provide them maintenance when they need it which is more often than people may suspect.

Wren sounds like quite the character. Do you reckon Wren is bored or perhaps just full of mischief (or something else altogether)? Your son must have had thoughts along those lines? Has he managed to acquire a new gander?

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Greetings Margaret the First!

I like your style! On the other hand horrors rarely see the humour in such things. I thought it was pretty funny! Most bosses are reasonably good however, on that particular occasion I scored a shocker, but was very careful not to repeat that error. And when they are horrors, well the details can vary wildly and most likely they have a little curl. Good to hear that you were the boss too - it is a good experience. And to be honest, accounting was once taught by apprenticeship and it wasn't that long ago.

In my time, I’ve met a few older accountants who had travelled that apprenticeship path. It may sound a bit petty but I was miffed at first when I found out that they paid $50 for a qualification that I had to sit both an under graduate and post graduate degrees in my own time and all of which I had to also pay for. On the other hand, if I hadn't had that experience, I may not have understood just how far we have declined as a society. When you think about it, corporations have somehow managed to get individuals to pay for something (time and wealth) that they once provided as part of a job. Anyway, I too promoted a very excellent accounts person into the role of assistant accountant and she was a very talented lady who is still working in the role, I believe. Despite being the boss, I had to fight tooth and nail to get that across the line. Bucking the system is not for the faint of heart!

Haha! Nope, just the occasional Christmas bushfire. If I recall correctly, two years ago some nutter in a town to the south of here apparently set fire to the bush south of here. Fortunately I believe the individual was under surveillance, but that makes for an exciting Christmas (in a Chevy Chase vacation sort of way)... Snow would be nice! Of course I have not travelled in snowfall so am having trouble understanding what that may entail?

Good to hear about the yoghurt. Well done you! Sandor mentioned to avoid using ultra pasteurised milk. The editor feels that the extra heating may have broken some protein chains in the milk? Dunno. Yoghurt is going well here too, and I cooked a backslopped batch today.

Honey bees can be a picky bunch can't they? And they don't go for every flower. Just for your interest, I noticed that this year they have begun harvesting pollen from the Dandelions, which is a flower they have avoided in previous years.

Stay safe in the snowfall and I hope that the play is good and that the kids enjoy themselves.

That happens here too - even without the snow. Houses here sell in spring and early summer and it is a brief window of time. Plus I have also suspected that people get a bit bummed out in winter due to low levels of sunlight. I spend a lot of time outside even during the depths of winter, so I don't notice that effect, but I can see it in other people.

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Pam,

They're not good at all. I spotted that our news service did an update on them within the last hour: Southern California wildfires still burning as Donald Trump issues federal emergency declaration.

With that in mind, the editor and I spent the day cleaning up in the orchards. Cleaning up involved mowing and picking up fallen sticks and branches. We even got the stump grinder out for a couple of hours. I may have to mow again in a few weeks given the combination of rain and sun. The next cut will be easier than this first cut though. The magpies are picking through the chunks of cut grass.

How many times per year do you have to mow?

The sun bites hard down here. Tourists are often surprised - and then burned... Sunscreen is a bit of a necessity here in the mid afternoons during summer.

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Margaret,

Thanks for sharing the story of your Christmas cards. They are a novel idea and I would have enjoyed receiving them too.

Yeah, the turkey idea was off beat, but you know, it is not as if people don't know where roast turkey comes from? Hehe! And it is very easy to offend people these days, the thing is though if the intentions are good, it seems a bit unreasonable for other people to complain because the misunderstanding may be with them? Dunno. That is a complex beast of a problem and people can get offended without entering into dialogue to clear up the misunderstanding, and so I wonder in those situations what their game actually is.

I'm not into e-cards, and nowadays not many folk actually send real live Christmas cards. I reckon that is another sign of decline. I believe I'm going to have to write and send some tomorrow!

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

Oh yeah! Speaking of brutalist architecture, you should see the post war housing stock down here which were inevitably constructed by the owners at a time when materials were in short supply shortly after WWII. They are very basic houses, but strangely enough the frames that went into those houses were quite good quality timbers and they are standing the test of time well. I have read that in those days after WWII, often the people in streets got together and assisted their neighbours with the construction process. It would have been a coherent community. One of my concerns is that people view houses as investment vehicles that yield a return. I don't necessarily agree with that view, but I am in the minority these days.

Brutalism. Oh, that's right. Some of the trade union buildings on the outskirts of the CBD of Melbourne were constructed in that style. They look to me to be unappealing above ground concrete bunker which are aping the very worst of Soviet era apartment constructions. No disrespect to the Russians, but far out a bit of Art Deco bling could have assisted with what are otherwise purely utilitarian buildings. Anyway, I walk past some of those buildings quite regularly and I note that the steel reinforcement is exposed and rusting away. The reason for that is that the reinforcement was not set deeply enough when the concrete was poured, and so oxygen has gotten at the steel and corroded it and breaking apart the concrete. Oh well.

One interesting thing about those concrete structures is that sometimes the concrete face was not finished before it had cured. In those cases, the ghost of the timber formwork can still be seen and there are the impressions of the timber that once was. It is almost as if the timber surface had been petrified. I have seen a petrified forest in the very south west of this state. It is quite interesting to see the deep time on display.

Yeah, "important" is a subjective terminology after all! But yeah, I hear you, the treasure trove of nitrate films is a window into the past. Much like the diggings at the Vindolanda fort. We get to peer into the past and see what the people back then were doing (or looking at in this case). History sort of bypasses the everyday, if only because nobody thought to take the time to say what was going on at that time in the past.

Kathleen Rockwell was an interesting character. What a life she led and I am impressed that she appears to have maintained a sense of social purpose even despite suffering hard times herself. Working the land was a very clever stratagem for her too.

cont...

orchidwallis said...

Hello again

25F here last night. White with frost outside but no snow. It did sleet for a short while yesterday.

I really don't know about Wren, adolescence perhaps.

No gander yet.

Have opened my mouth when perhaps I shouldn't and wonder what you would have done. A friend of my neighbour is buying some land down here; contracts have not yet been exchanged. I have heard that he plans to grow vegetables. I know that the land is heavily and dangerously polluted but it is possible that the seller is unaware of the fact not that he would care anyway. I have told the neighbour.

Inge

Fernglade Farm said...

I'd heard about that civil unrest back in the day. We live in a strange society that such neo-liberal economic policies would be attempted after they received such a poor reception in the distant past.

Oh no. I had no idea about the complexities of nitrate film. What a disaster and I note that in 1978 the United States National Archives and Records Administration and George Eastman House had their nitrate film vaults auto-ignite. Oops! A lot of products are spruiked as being "safe", until they're not safe. Nuclear energy seems a lot like that to me. It is sort of OK until things go wrong, and then it is not good. Plus the waste is hard to send "away", wherever that place is. They may have the good magical unicorns there...

I have seen footage of film bubbling away as the film became stuck in the projector and overheated, but I can’t for the life of me remember where. I guess that is better outcome than the cinema burning down to the ground.

Well, immunity is a herd thing and so getting the flu shot is probably a pretty good idea in your circumstances. I had the flu earlier this year and it was not fun.

I hope your mate’s sister chooses the common sense option, and if the house is not defendable and she is not physically or mentally up for the confrontation, she runs for her life - early? I hope she stays safe.

Don't want to say that I told you so, but Mr White is a big advocate for analogue recordings. Hehe! Exactly, when they're wrong, they don't want to admit it. Actually new turntables often have USB connectivity so the record can be converted to mp3 compressed audio format which will prolong the lifespan of the vinyl. It is worth mentioning that mp3 lacks the dynamic range of vinyl which will sound richer (that is just my old geeky music nerd hat!) I reckon vinyl is a nice medium for music, but I grew up at a time when it was in widespread use and I used to work in a shop that sold the replacement turntable needles and drive belts. The turntable units were more repairable than the digital stuff of today.

I reckon there may also be an element to the story of: You can look at this vinyl record, but you may not be able to access the contents. It is not as if we don't live in a day when parents are snooping on their kids via social media. I heard a disturbing story about that a few months back and I gave good advice on the matter - which was largely ignored. Oh well. Plus I reckon the author is onto something about the physical nature of the product. It is a bit like books really. I have never read or used an e-reader, but I'm old school... Perhaps I'm a dinosaur? But then Mr Poopy and I just got back inside the house from supervising fifteen little dinosaurs run around the orchard. Mr Poopy thinks that it is better than television, and he may well be correct!

Cheers

Chris

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Chris and Margaret:

Since so many, if not most, flowering plants have medicinal purposes, I have wondered if bees don't switch to collecting pollen from different ones because they recognize that they have a particular need of certain nutrients from that plant? That would mean that pollen carries the some of the same nutrients as the rest of the plant, of which I have no idea.

Chris:

Since our non-garden and non-woodland area is very small, and since it is about 50% moss, 25% "weeds", and 25% grass we only mow it about 5 times in the growing season. We can let it get rather tall since there are no lawn monitors around - which one would find in a proper neighborhood.

I am very proud of you, Mr. Poopy, future Guardian of the Flock. Perhaps you can work your way up to sheep dog trials, umm, Lap Dog trials . . .

Pam

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - First, the really important stuff :-). The old (very old) saying is "One swallow does not a summer make." Aristotle. And, Aesop wrote a fable on the theme. Young man with a gambling problem (didn't he hear of GA?) sees a swallow, decides he can sell his last possession, his warm cloak. Freezes to death.

I wonder if /when the insurance industry will abandon large tracts of California? As they have areas of Florida and the Gulf Coast. There doesn't seem to be a well organized Federal fire insurance program, as there is with flood insurance. But it's government entities that pay out a lot for fire fighting.

Yup, I've seen that timber grain impressed into concrete and think it's really cool looking. I think sometimes it's intentional.

I read the little booklet, last night, that came along with the Dawson City films, DVD. They really don't say much about if a cool piece of film they discovered is the only remaining copy. I think much of it is. One real high point. Extensive footage of the 1919 Baseball World Series. That was the one where there was a huge game fixing scandal. Now they have actual footage of the dodgy plays that baseball fans have always wondered about. Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. The booklet said that nitrate film is just a few chemical tweaks away from the explosive nitro. It will even keep burning when submerged in water. The projection booth of the old theatre I camped out in was entirely lined with metal.

I finished up the vinyl section of "The Revenge of Analog", last night. A couple of turn table companies managed to make it through the down turn and are not banging along and a few new companies have entered the market. I just happened to think that the turn table I dragged around for years was from your old Alma Mater, Tandy / Radio Shack. I finally tossed it and sold off my records when I moved out to the boonies. I finally faced up to the fact that I'm really not a musical kind of a guy and hadn't spun a platter in decades. I now have a small radio/cassette/cd player and a small stack of cds. Sometimes, I think I'd like (get a whim) to pick up some more cds. The complete ... Beatles, Beach Boys, Simon & Garfunkel. But I have to remind myself that I haven't spun a CD in years, either. :-).

Speaking of dinosaurs running around your orchard, there's another Jurassic Park movie in the works. Lew

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Pam,

Yeah! You know I'd never thought about flowering plants and bees from that perspective. The bees are such sensitive creatures and little mobile chemical factories that they would know exactly what they need to harvest. And their ability to communicate and make decisions in the hive is really quite amazing. Wow! My mind is blown away by your thought. Top work!

Anyone silly enough to attempt lawn monitoring services here may find themselves quickly up to their eyeballs in mowing work. I have heard of clean up orders being used against residents and it sounds like an unpleasant business to me.

Yup! Mr Poopy, him lap dog! He is still in the way too excited phase of his dog – chicken interaction training…

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

Aristotle and, Aesop were onto something with those astute observations. Mate, the climate here makes for nervous summers, so you don't have to remind me. On the other hand, a person can only do their best and experience the world one day at a time. I mean, what else can you do? Did Aristotle and Aesop mention the way out of that predicament which they raised? Humility? Adaptability? Certainly my take here is that the climate will get hotter, colder, windier, wetter, drier, and just all round more and more extreme - in every direction. I sometimes see it in my mind like a balloon that a person is filling with water and trying to hold in their hands at the same time. The balloon bulges at every opportunity...

The insurance industry is a real worry. And it is one of the reasons I keep upgrading the water systems here - particularly the mounted sprinklers. Mandating flood insurance has sent my premiums sky rocketing in recent years. They're really quite impressive bills. And I am aware that during Black Saturday, half of all of the 2,000 damaged structures were apparently uninsured. Yup it is a problem, and in California, the estimated damage numbers were staggering... They were certainly beyond my comprehension. It is a real problem. Down here, the local councils collect a fire levy on each rateable property, and that levy is used to fund the metropolitan and rural fire services. Interestingly, I read about a rural brigade north of here that was apparently involved in some sort of hazing ritual... That was an unusual act and it sounds like assault in the legal sense of that word to me.

It is cool isn't it? The grain in all of the timbers is preserved in good clarity. It isn't as common a technique nowadays as concrete panels are poured off site at factories and then trucked onto construction sites where they have to be lifted into place by huge cranes. Lego construction. I prefer my construction a bit more human scaled.

That is a shame about the lack of analysis with the Dawson City films. People can get a bit funny about expressing an opinion or heaven help us all if a value judgement gets expressed! Hehe! Far out. The Baseball World Series footage would really bring out the "trainspotters" and it would give them all years of discussion. Given that nobody on that footage would be alive today, it is probably a safe bet to go hard and speculate on the events. Match fixing is a dirty business. It most likely goes on, especially if the incentives are good. Back then perhaps players were paid in fame rather than a living?

I don't know whether you have seen the film: The Club (1980 film), based on the play written by the playwright David Williamson. I quite enjoyed the story. And I recall at one point one of the players mentioned (the film was from the late 70's early 80's) that upon retirement from the game, they'd look forward to having enough money to buy a pizza for themselves and their mate! An amusing observation.

cont...

Fernglade Farm said...

Oh yeah, that nitrate film is not one for the careless. I've met a few of those in my time! Having just said that I better now be careful in case I do something really stupid here... Yes, the article I read on the film said that the chemical was not dissimilar from guncotton whatever that is. Plus it contains oxygen, so like you say, it is almost impossible to put out... Did you operate a projector at one point in your life? Cool! I'm getting minor Fight Club flashbacks! It always comes back to Fight Club, you know!

Exactly, what do you hang onto? Someone wise once said something about the things that you own end up owning you, or something like that. Yes, I had a Tandy / Radio Shack turntable too. It was a fine device - linear tracking no less. But like you, I just did not use it. I prefer to listen to the radio - and the government youth station too. I don't like all of the music they play, but I like a lot of it. I also respect the artists for coming up with new stuff in a saturated and over churned market. It is a really impressive feat.

Sir Paul performed in Melbourne on Wednesday night, and he was interviewed on the youth station too. It would be hard not to be cool being him, he has accumulated much mojo!

Simon and Garfunkel's a Concert in Central Park is possibly my favourite out of those choices. They appear to hate each others guts, and I was rather amused that their previous tour was titled "Old friends" tour. Perhaps they were discussing the past, or maybe it was an intended chunk of irony? Whatever, they tell a good tale! How good is the Boxer?

Cheers

Chris

Fernglade Farm said...

Hi Lewis,

Just finished writing and editing. I spotted this but forgot to mention it to you. I had been wondering about this for a while now: Puerto Ricans still seeking refuge in Florida months after Hurricane Maria decimated their homes.

Chris

margfh said...

Hi Pam,

That's an interesting thought that makes some sense. I did observe the chamomile closely for some years due to the fact that harvesting the blossoms was quite time consuming and the honey bees never frequented it too much unlike so many other pollinators.

Margaret

margfh said...

Hi Chris,

The play was quite good for kids between the ages of 10 - 13. This is a home school theater group and they do a very professional job. There are four performances a year and the girls are in two of them. It was a very long drive though over 1 1/2 hours each way and complicated by our first snow on the way home though for only part of the way. We didn't get home until almost 11:30 - about 2 hours past my bed time. Took our daughter out to a Thai restaurant before the play which was very good and there was enough to take home as well.

Margaret

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Aristotle and Aesop (together again?). I suppose a lot of those fables were about planning ahead and not taking things at face value. I seem to remember being aware of Aesop, pretty early on. Maybe a book from the library? Maybe at school? Heck, could have been Saturday morning cartoons. They made pretty good stories. "Grasshopper and the Ant" was another biggie.

Haven't seen "The Club." Given my antipathy to "all things sports." :-). When the Dawson documentary got to the part about the 1919 World Series, they mentioned how poorly paid the players were ... at that time. Did I mention they think there's, maybe, another 500 cans of film still buried? I wonder if they'll get around to digging them out? Getting the volatile films out of Dawson and down to Ottawa was a tale in itself. No one wanted to transport that lot. Finally, the military was called in. They're used to moving around unstable stuff.

I've had a small amount of experience with projectors. Grade school stuff. I could work out minor problems. Nothing to do with theatre projectors. Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. I think I mentioned I read a Paul Simon bio, a few months ago. I see in my book catalog that I get that Garfunkel has also written a biography. Haven't gotten around to seeing if our local library has a copy. Their's seems to be an on again, off again friendship. You mix friendship, business and creativity. Well, it's about as unstable as old film stock :-). And, on one hand, they would like to be known for their own accomplishments beyond the duo ... but, if they can stand being on stage with each other for a couple of concerts, can rake in big bucks in pretty short order.

Puerto Rico has pretty much dropped off the news. Interesting case. It's a US protectorate. There's a faction that would like to have it become a State, and, another that pushes for independence. Being a protectorate, it's pretty easy for people to move back and forth. Always has been.

So. We're getting all these climate refugees, within our own borders (more or less). I heard a report on the results of the fires in Northern California, the other day. They had a pretty bad homeless problem, before the fires. Now, it's just exploded. Housing prices (to buy or rent) just took a huge jump. Pricing a lot of people out of both markets. Besides plane old market pressure, you had a lot of situations where, say a landlord had one rental. His home got burned out. But the rental survived. Where's he going to live? The rental, of course. I suppose the same will happen in S. California.

I watched Al Gore's new climate movie, last night. "An Inconvenient Sequel." A "good news", "bad news" kind of a film. The weather, world wide, continues to get worse. On the other hand, considered globally, alternative energy sources are increasing in leaps and bounds.

Saw an article over at NPR that China has decided to stop taking our recycling. There's lots of scrambling around, trying to find alternative markets. But, it doesn't look good.

Well, lots to do today. Our yearly apartment inspection, tomorrow. Jeff, our maintenance guy does it. I don't think it's really a big deal, but it inspires me to get to little odds and ends that I've been putting off. Moving around a bit of furniture. Hang more pictures on the walls. Get more books off the floor and on the shelves. :-). Lew