Monday, 19 September 2016

The Curse of Cherokee

This blog is now available as an mp3 podcast through the link: www.ferngladefarm.com.au/2016 Sep 19 - The Curse of Cherokee.mp3

The Curse of Cherokee is a thing to be feared. It seems as if every time I utilise the bright yellow trailer to bring a full load of composted woody mulch back to the farm with the intent to use it later in the day, the Curse of Cherokee strikes. It appears to me that the combination of 1: a load of composted woody mulch and 2: the intention to use it later; are the triggers for the curse. And when the dreaded curse strikes, the consequences can be as extreme as an unanticipated natural disaster, or as simple as a project mysteriously taking far longer than I had originally anticipated.

This week was no exception because that composted woody mulch sat in the bright yellow trailer teasing me because it must have known that it was waiting to be used later that day, and then the clouds began to slowly deliver epic amounts of rain. And just for good measure, it then rained some more over the next day or so and that composted woody mulch happily sat in the bright yellow trailer staring at me and reminding me as to who had the upper hand here! The Curse of Cherokee had struck yet again!
A cubic metre (1.3 cubic yards) of composted woody mulch sits in the bright yellow trailer waiting to be used on the farm
The composted woody mulch had been purchased locally and brought back up the hill to the farm so as to provide a solid covering of organic matter for the recent excavations on the new garden terrace. Composted woody mulch is the fancy name for composted green waste which is collected by all the local councils in Melbourne from householders. The collected green waste is then processed at a huge composting facility and at a much later date, resold to the public.

I intended to utilise the mulch by placing it in a thick layer over the exposed clay of any new excavations or garden beds. Eventually the mulch would form a rich black loam soil. That mulch will also slow down the movement of water across the soil surface whenever it rains. If water ever moves across bare soil surfaces, then erosion can occur as it takes the clay particles along with it for the ride. When you live on the side of a mountain and there is a heavy rainfall, erosion can be a serious problem!

This week it rained a lot over the farm, but that rain was gently persistent and over a long period of time, rather than a very heavy rainfall. Regular readers will recall that it has been a very wet winter here already and as such the groundwater table is quite high. Also the water tanks were already full well before this rain. All of that water had to go somewhere and the swale was where all of that excess water ended up here.
The swale has been full of water here for several days
The purpose of the swale is to collect any excess water and allow it to slowly absorb into the groundwater table rather than simply running across the surface and possibly causing erosion. Observant readers will notice the very healthy looking willows enjoying a nice drink. There is also a sugar maple and a ficus planted into that swale.

For only the second time in about ten years, several natural springs began unexpectedly releasing huge quantities of flowing water as if someone had turned on a tap! And crystal clear water flowed out of those springs for days afterwards.
Cherokee Mineral Springs - One of a few natural springs began flowing crystal clear water this week as if someone had turned on a tap
Local lore has it that water cannot be held above the ground here in farm dams or ponds because the area is too well drained. Well, for a few days after the rainfall, there were actually pools of water in depressions in the ground. But the interesting thing was that not all depressions in the ground held water, but where it did, the water was again crystal clear.
One of the depressions in the ground near the orchard which held crystal clear water
The ground must be wet as I even observed this poor earthworm whom had clearly dug its way out of the ground just to get some fresh air!
This poor earthworm had clearly dug its way out of the ground just to get some fresh air
After a few days of continual rain, I started to regret purchasing that mulch before I was ready to place it over the new excavations (which incidentally had become a mud pit). The Curse of Cherokee had struck again.

Mind you, there were no major disasters here and all of the plants received a good drink and everything is now looking very green and healthy. Unfortunately, all of that rainfall ended up flooding the local Macedon River / Riddell’s Creek (it has two different names for some strange reason) in the valley below. And this is what I could see from my Eagles Eyrie:
Flooding in Macedon River / Riddell’s Creek in the valley below the mountain range
The flooding was quite extensive, but it must be noted that no houses were inundated  as nobody has ever built in low lying areas, and also the livestock had been moved to higher ground before the rains arrived. Looking back from the floods towards the mountain range provides a good glimpse of how much rainfall in that catchment area the river has to occasionally accommodate:
Looking back from the flood to the Macedon Ranges
The flood waters were not very far below the main road and/or the bridge deck over the river which leads out of this part of the mountain range. In 2010 during a particularly wet five days (250mm or 10 inches of rainfall) I have seen that main road underwater:
The floodwaters were not far below the level of the road surface and bridge deck
After a couple of days the floodwaters receded and the paddocks looked very damp indeed. Fortunately for those readers that were concerned about this situation, it will rain again tomorrow night and again next weekend!

One of the strangest things that I observed this week during the recent heavy rain was in the chicken run. The chickens here lead a charmed life as their hen house and attached run is not only completely vermin proof, but it is also covered over completely by a solid steel sheet roof. Don’t ever feel remotely concerned for the welfare of the spoilt chickens here! As the chicken run is an all-weather run, the chickens socialise and get up to their chicken mischief all day long in the deep litter in the chicken run despite the outside conditions. The deep litter is composed of their used sugar cane straw bedding mixed in with their manure. This deep litter is usually dry, but the rain was so heavy and persistent that a bit of rain entered the chicken run and made the deep litter mildly damp. Don’t feel bad for the chickens as this turn of events was barely even noticed by them! However, the combination of a bit of moisture, used bedding straw, and chicken manure increased the bacterial action in that deep litter and the mass soon became warm to the touch. It is worthwhile mentioning that occasionally the chickens will lay an egg into that deep litter. Well here is an egg that I uncovered in the depths of that warm deep litter:
An egg was hard boiled this week in the chicken run due to the heat from bacterial action
The outside of the egg was quite dirty as it had been buried in the deep litter, so I had decided to feed the egg to the dogs. It was a complete surprise to me to find that the egg had become almost fully hard boiled in the chicken run… I thought at the time that the egg was strangely warm to touch.

We’re tough here at Fernglade farm, however we don’t really like getting wet whilst working in the rain. Finally it stopped raining and in a fit of pent up energy, we decided to bring some very heavy rocks up the hill in the wheelbarrow for the new rock wall near the chicken enclosure. That is some hard work. However that rock wall is now almost complete!
Some large rocks were brought up the hill in a wheelbarrow for the new rock wall near the chicken enclosure
And yet we still hadn’t managed to get enough of a break in the rain to empty the bright yellow trailer of that load of mulch! So instead we decided to start germinating the summer crops of seedlings. Tomatoes, Capsicum (peppers), Zucchini (courgettes), and Melons were all started inside the house this week.
The summer crops of seedlings including: Tomatoes; Capsicum (peppers); Zucchini (courgettes); and Melons were started inside the house this week
Even the Swiss Brown mushrooms started producing some fruiting bodies this week.
The Swiss Brown mushrooms started to produce some fruiting bodies this week
Finally a day dawned when no rain was predicted and the sun shone. Ah, bliss! The excavations for the new garden terrace were then able to be continued and the new terrace has now almost doubled in size. The vision for the blackberry and raspberry bed has also changed and we are going to almost double its current size!
The rain stopped and we were able to continue excavations on the new terrace for the berry beds
Observant readers may notice how muddy that new garden terrace was. Honestly, we only had to walk a couple of metres in order to gain several inches of height due to all of the muddy clay stuck to our work boots… And the curse hadn’t been lifted yet as the mulch was still sitting in the bright yellow trailer. Oh, that rotten curse and the mulch!

The concrete staircase leading up to that new garden terrace also had two additional steps added this week. A bit of quick thinking meant that we placed a rain shield over the top most step just before the rain drops began to pock mark the not as yet dry cement surface.
Two new steps were added to the concrete staircase leading up to the new garden terrace
Finally, the Curse of Cherokee was lifted as there was enough of a break in the rain for us to empty the bright yellow trailer of composted woody mulch and place it all on the new terrace. 
A cubic metre (1.3 cubic yards) of composted woody mulch was placed over the newly excavated terrace
Most of the plants have enjoyed the heavy rains. I recently moved an Avocado seedling to a new and much sunnier location and it has produced new growth in only a few days.
An avocado seedling was moved to a sunnier spot and with the rain it has produced new growth
The local ferns which give this farm its name have gone feral with so much rain. This mother shield fern has produced many new fronds:
A mother shield fern has produced many new fronds with the heavy rain
The broad beans have also enjoyed the rain, and despite being planted almost two months late they are now looking quite good:
The broad beans which were planted two months late are looking very healthy
The ornamental cherry trees have started to produce blossoms well before the fruiting tree cherry trees. Those ornamental cherry trees are some of the hardiest trees around and the weeping example in the next photo has been moved almost four times in its life. It is also producing many cherry tree seedlings around it. That tree may well be a Triffid in disguise?
This ornamental cherry tree is tough as to heat, rain and drought
And I added the next photograph just because I thought the combination of super tough Echium’s, Leucadendron's, and Irish Strawberry Tree looked good…
This combination of super tough Echium’s, Leucadenron's, and Irish Strawberry Tree looks good
The temperature outside now at about 9.30pm is 4.7’C (40.5’F). So far this year there has been 894.6mm (35.2 inches) which is up from last week’s total of 808.8mm (31.8 inches).

63 comments:

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Ah, you've come up with the perfect run of words to describe the kind of rain we often get here. "Gently persistent rain." A lot nicer ... more poetic? ... than "showers on and off."

I think I've maybe figured out the cause of the Curse of Cherokee. Your not paying enough attention to the goddesses of all those springs. Our ancestors knew better. :-). I mean, they make an appearance twice in ten years and you look at them, take pictures of them and complain when they come up under your wood shed. LOL. You should be naming them and offering them a bit of something. Maybe even a mulch boiled egg?

Interesting that. Plenty of reptiles lay their eggs in piles of leaf mold. Wonder how they figure out how to provide enough heat for incubation, but not enough for cooking? Mysteries from our wonders of nature department.

I envy you your mushrooms. My second batch of shitakes, went to mold. I guess I kept the little plastic tent on for too long of periods. Sigh. So, $35 for about 4 large shitake mushrooms. Not very cost effective :-). My local store has shitake mushrooms for about $3 for 3.5 oz. Which is about enough to jazz up three meals. More cost effective (so far) but not very resilient.

Watch those cherry tree seedlings. They can overrun a place. There certainly are quit a few around here. I've been thinking lately about how often, you intentionally plant something and can't keep it alive no matter what you do. But some volunteers? Once they are established you can't kill them with a club.

I made a big batch of Russian sweet cabbage soup, yesterday. My digestion is still a bit off and my friends in Idaho swear by it. Enough for 4 meals, now, and 7 meals to pop in the freezer. Got the recipe from allrecipes.com. The recipe is a keeper, but I had to laugh at myself. I started looking at it and I had made 7 "adjustments" to it, along the way. Oh, stuff like using red cabbage and onion (I think it's healthier ... the more color ...). I didn't have any beef bouillon cubes ... I don't use them anyway. Too much salt. But, I had a cup or so of beef stock in the freezer. And, so it goes. It turned out a lot different than what I had imagined. But, good.

I got Alexander's "Cooks Companion" the other day. haven't had time to sit down and give it a good browse. I also have her biography on order, but it hasn't shown up yet. Lew

TalkingTrees said...

Hello Chris

The original walnut tree was here when we bought the farm twenty years ago but it was not very old. The second tree grew under the water tank stand at the old house and when it grew too tall we moved it into an open space and cut the top off. It is now a large tree. I think Lew is right when he says that intentional plantings fail and volunteers succeed in so many cases.

I have grown other walnut trees from seed that I bought many years ago from Phoenix Seeds in Tasmania. Unfortunately they were left behind on our last property.

We had another 34mls of rain over the weekend. We have springs popping up all over our hills too. The gutters along our road to town, which is a Track, are flowing freely and there is a lot of damage occurring to the bitumen. Friends live to the West of us and sections of their gravel road are dangerous to travel at present.

Like you and the editor we are finding it tricky to get into the garden and up into the property to work but today was dry so some outside work was possible.

Warm Regards, Helen

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Fair enough, it is hard for me to discern any trend in the climate here as one season can be so different than the previous year. What I have noticed is that extreme weather events are tending to become slightly more extreme as time goes on. No doubts about your observation about the island effect on climate - a very astute observation!

Oh my goodness, what an interesting turn of events. Do you know that the art of negotiation is not as well practiced in our society as it should be? Of course, you probably do know that already. A sale is made when a buyer and seller meet and can agree on a price, the rest is details! :-)! Of course, that does not assist you. In such a situation I may reach for an independent valuation whom both parties are comfortable with as a starting point? Dunno.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Cooties, is a very amusing scientific term. Does this mean that just like hubris and nemesis, cooties lead to unpleasant circumstances? :-)! It is interesting about Nemesis being personified as the definition of the word indicates that that was the situation. I'd never quite thought of language that way before and I have to take a bit of time to properly process that understanding. A mate of mine often threatens me by saying I’m afraid of doing this or that because I’ll get cooties!

Your truck definitely sounds like a dirt rat! :-)! Dirt rats of the world unite... Were you ever interested in cars in your earlier life? I used to be a bit of a petrol head, but then that was before I wrote off my car in a nasty head on accident - I walked out of it too (a little bit shaken and possibly also stirred).

Yes of course, the humble vagabond. That word conjures mental images doesn't it? Actually, people are falling off the edge economically here, I just reckon they are falling often into the disenfranchised camp - and that is not a good place for anyone. I was listening to a youth news program this afternoon and the commentator seemed genuinely baffled at what he called the rise of the far right extremist. I honestly felt calling him up and saying, look Tom, I'm pretty sure you could conjure up: Pol Pot; Stalin; Castro; Mussolini for the far left extremist camp. Such is the equal opportunity nature of that beast. Anyway, the commentator just could grasp the economic realities of the policies currently being pursued.

Maybe, that certainly is as good a reason as any? We'll never know really. So many stories get lost in the passage of time.

Thanks for the link to the CCC during the Great Depression. Wow. They had a similar thing in operation down here and the guys involved were described as "Susso workers". The Susso referred to Sustenance work. They did some pretty amazing civil engineering works during that time. At a basic level, the disenfranchised actually just want to work and thus not be excluded from society, the ideologies that entrap them tend to provide those lives with meaning.

Showers on and off is a bit perfunctory and also obscure, don't you think? ;-)! Glad you liked the turn of phrase. I often joke that during drier winters, it rains a lot, but not much rain falls... Not this year though...

Oh you are so right. Of course, that should have been perfectly obvious to me. In Asia those shrines are everywhere, so of course, it makes perfect sense. Of course, as I have photos (and I most certainly do not show all of the photos, nor all of the work done here) I know exactly where the springs are. ;-)!

Oh yeah, the reptiles are very clever as to work that out. Also, there are many shore birds who lay their eggs in the sand along the beach. I recently saw a council removing sand from what appeared to me to be just such an area. The sand was being used to prop up the sand near the swimming beach. Big trucks were involved...

The surprising thing about the mushrooms is that I thought that they were Swiss Browns, but they do look an awful lot like Portobello mushrooms... Hey, mushrooms are cheaper down here for some strange reason. I worked it backwards and 3.5oz would be about $2 here... Go figure that one out... The shitake are pretty tasty - especially in soups. Yum!

What only seven adjustments!!! Hehe! Well done you! Your soup sounds intriguing and it is nice to hear of your experimentations and also that the soup ended up being tasty. Of course, don't you reckon that some of the art of cooking is about knowing what goes well with what?

I read down here that someone was promoting some sort of 91 step dessert... Honestly, how complex do they want to make food?

It is a good book, and it covers basics as well as very high end stuff. I use that book as a go to book. I'd be interested to hear of your opinion of it? The biography would be interesting too.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Helen,

Thanks for writing about your walnut trees. I reckon Lewis is correct about the volunteer seedlings being hardier than the deliberately planted trees too. I am always on the lookout for those plants dotted about the area. It is amazing what turns up from time to time, it also says much about the conditions that the plants like. Your walnut tree would have enjoyed the shade from the water tank stand - and dare I say it, the occasional drink would have been enjoyed too? I had to go back and retighten all of the joins in the replacement water pipes which were only installed two weeks back. I wonder whether the occasional bit of sun loosened them off? Dunno?

Oh, I've heard of Phoenix Seeds. Seed catalogues are such a temptation aren't they? I get the Diggers Club catalogue and it is lovely to look at. So many plants, so little time!

Our conditions sound pretty much the same right now and down here, between one and two inches of rain will fall tomorrow... Wow, it is wet. And the potholes are never ending (even on the main roads including the freeways). I hit one the other day at speed and the cars suspension made an unpleasant crunch sound which made me wince in mechanical sympathy.

Yeah, it is hard this season. Nice to read that you got outside though! It is a good season for transplanting plants I believe.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

That is very wise. Also, you are in the process of developing a different relationship with a different power structure. It will be interesting to see how that progresses in time. Some people are unable to adjust to those circumstances and you can see that when they communicate in a mode that tends to reinforce the old relationship. I tend to feel that status is a thing that can never be held for long, so I no longer play that game, but plenty of people do so and it is fascinating to watch.

Yeah, that is true. It is also important to recognise when it is not appropriate to rise to other peoples expectations and I reckon I'd call that discernment? Mate, I learned that lesson the hard way, but was fortunately young enough to bounce back easily. Of course, you are a natural teacher. I'm always more interested in whether people have the desire to learn rather than any inherent abilities in a particular area. There is a wide gap between those two points and it is quite telling. I know of many very smart people, way beyond my understanding, and they have quite closed minds which is a situation that I find mildly baffling. You wouldn't see that attitude in children, so I wonder where they learned that trick?

Good for you. I hope the group goes well. I noticed that when it was the winter time numbers dropped off a bit, but you lot in Canada maybe hardier than us down here? We feel the winter cold differently, but then we plough through the summer heat differently too!

No worries and fair enough. I appreciate you considering the matter. Many different people ask me in all sorts of ways. I have my own perspective on the subject but it involves a lot of hard work and also accepting sharp limitations, and what I was trying to do with the question was get into a different head space and try to understand the matter from a wholly different perspective. Like what does this problem look like to you and how do you feel about it? Sorry, it is a bit heavy, but it is an awkward topic down here for obvious reasons, although I rarely shy away from such discussions.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Between one and two inches of rain is forecast to fall here tomorrow morning... Wow.

Over in the SW of the state along the coastline in the fire affected area, I spotted this article in the newspaper: Victorian floods: Risk of major landslide on Great Ocean Road as state braces for more rain . They already had a landslide there about a week ago I believe. Not good.

Cheers

Chris

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Hi Chris,

Well, you seem to have a problem with water: first the pipes and now a downpour. I wonder which water god you've annoyed? The egg being cooked by microbial action is fairly impressive, I wonder if it would be possible to use compost to cook now. I'll have to look into it, but if so, this could help save a lot of energy.

Status can't be held for long, but having held quite substantial power in some groups before, it feels quite good to have. Of course, I also am one of the few people I know who attempts to be moderate and helpful when I have power. I understand both it's dependent on others' cooperation, and I have a sense of "noblesse oblige", both for myself and others. It's rare to see anyone live up to it, and I often don't, but that's no reason not to try. The fight for status is quite intense and distracting though, so I'm starting to opt out altogether.

In regards to my professor, he was quite happy to let me lead for the little business we had (planning when we will meet), and otherwise took a role very different from a professor. He talks a fair bit, but at a couple points he wanted to make sure everyone else talked, and would freely give an opinion and listen to what others said. I'm fairly sure it won't be a problem having him in the group, although I may be wrong. I hope I'm not, but it's possible.

Discernment is a good term for that, and I think it's a very good skill to have. I need to work on it, but there's lots of things I need to work on. I am not a natural teacher. I'm autistic, with a range of social impairments: teaching, among other things, does not come naturally to me, but I enjoy it, so I put time and effort into it. I'm also willing to let people tell me what does and doesn't work, so I learn, and then get better at teaching. And for smart people with closed minds: it does occur in children, at least the older ones. I think the reason why is that we as a society teach the gifted kids that they are special, and don't need to learn from those of us who are "normal". A very good way to stop that is to remind them that not everyone who's smart and important was in the gifted program, especially if you have examples at hand. I find that in lots of things though, kids can change their minds faster and easier than adults, so I'm fairly sure most adults are a lost cause here.

One last point about gifted programs: I'm still a little bitter, but mostly amused, at the fact I almost got into a gifted program, but didn't because my handwriting is terrible. I could, and still can, write many times faster than anyone I know, but it is very messy.

Well, I'll let you know what happens with the group over the winter. I figure it might drop a little bit, but it may also grow as more people hear about us and decide to join. I find it unlikely only five ADR readers exist in Ottawa, and I think once it's set up, more people may come and join.

I respect anyone who asks questions, especially the awkward ones. I'm still thinking about it, but I wonder if it has to do with something I've noticed about people: we seem quite capable of asking the same question and expecting a different response. I've never given it too much thought: I've always assumed buying a house is going to be expensive and require sacrifices. With housing costs I'm not sure it's worth while for me, but I always knew it would take time and effort, and a lot of money.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Oh, there's the occasional vehicle I like the look of, but I'm lucky to tell the difference between VWs and Ramblers. Just didn't get the "car" gene. Your wreck sounded very James Bondian :-).

About the guy on youth radio ... so many people just don't have a clue. I think that's why Mr. Greer is a bit on the pragmatic side. He's been fielding nonsense for years. Sometimes I wonder about the posts to his blog we never see. Might be interesting (briefly) from an entertainment point of view.

The CCC did a lot of great work, especially in the National Parks. Lots of stone and timber. Lodges. Fire lookouts. Scenic highways. I always though it interesting (and, far sighted) that the "guys" had a certain amount of their wages that were deducted and sent home.

The Romans and the Celts were both big on slapping a personification on any bit of water. From springs to rivers to oceans. I was just watching something about how they merged their beliefs at the hot springs in Bath, England. Sulis (Celtic) Minerva (Roman.) When it comes to sacrifice, any bit of precious metal will do :-). These days, you could probably get away with any shiny bit of cheap bling :-). Maybe a chicken? Check out the innards. The whole future may unfold. Puppy sacrifices were not unknown.

Thanksgiving will be here before you know it, so I've got a bit of turkey stock to use up. A bit of rice, a bit of veg ... a little meat and mushrooms. Soup! Oh, some more tweaks I did on the cabbage soup was I doubled the garlic. Three cloves for a half gallon plus of soup just didn't sound like enough. I increased the amount of vinegar. I thought I was looking at a recipe for sweet and sour cabbage soup ... but it was just sweet cabbage soup. Thought the recipe was a little light on vinegar. I wonder what it would taste like if I used the same recipe, but used sauerkraut instead of fresh cabbage? Hmmmm.

A 91 step, anything, just sounds insane. Is it cooking, or an endurance contest? Sometimes I'll look at a list of ingredients in a recipe and think "No. Just too much." Too many ingredients indicate (to me) that the recipe is going to be just a bit to fiddly for my short attention span. :-). Or, I'm old, time is short :-).

I have a bad habit of putting stuff up, and then never getting around to using it. I'm saving it for "special" or something. I'm trying to break myself of the habit. Ever happen to you?

That's quit a bit of rainfall, and the attendant mess. I see in Ballarat, they fell back on that old photographic trope "Swing Set in Floodwaters." Can't seem to have a flood event, anytime, anywhere and not trot out that old chestnut. I've got season two of the Dr. Edwards Mysteries (filmed in Ballarat) on hold at the library. Probably won't get them for a few weeks. Plenty to read in the meantime. Lew

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Chris,

I think I've figured the housing question out. I think it has to do with three things: First, people seem capable of asking the same question and expecting the same result. Second: owning a house is supposed to be normal. Third, it isn't. This results in a tension: most people can't do something they think they should be able to. They ask, you reinforce their observation. But, then society says "no, owning a house is normal and should be easy. If you skip coffee, you can do it!" So they ask again, thinking you forgot something, or exaggerated, or there's some secret you haven't told them. Thus your interesting pattern of repeat questions. If this helps, glad to be of service, if not, please let me know and I'll see about other ideas.

Now, question for you: what kind of things does your green wizard group do? In particular, aside from offering support, is there any way you engage in any of the practical aspects of preparing for and handling the Long Descent?

Also, 91 step desserts??? Wow, and I thought the ginger and green tea cheesecake I made was complicated. It's good, but I think I need to tweak it a little. Too much sugar, not enough green tea, otherwise good though. I have a Japanese cookbook, and have been playing with it, so far, it's good, and the ingredients it means I have make good meals without the book. Rice, soy sauce and ginger work well together, add some vegetables and you have a quick and easy meal.

My personal favorite dessert, however, is one step: get an apple. In an industrial society, very, very easy. Lots of people don't count it as a dessert, but I personally think fruits are good desserts. I'm rather fond of quite a few, but apples are easily my favorite.

Lew,

Here in Canada (I'm 95% sure you're an American, if not, my apologies) we have our thanksgiving earlier than you (although my family traditionally celebrates both), so on the 10th, turkey dinner for me! I'm fairly excited, however I'm a little sad I won't have leftovers this time. Still, it's worth getting my own place despite the drawbacks. I like the sides as well, but I find that the best foods are often the simple ones. It's a personal thing, but too many flavors ruins a food for me. I find that fairly often spices are overused, to the point the food itself can't be tasted at all.

Jo said...

Hi Chris, fun fact, here in Launceston we are a couple of weeks away from breaking the 'most rain in a year' record, and it is only September..

Does anyone remember the truck driver Rain God from the Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy series? Well, his new truck run is clearly the Tasmania-Victoria route..

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Don't most vehicles look pretty much the same nowadays? Where are the fins and massive bolt on fiberglass spoilers these days? Ha! Had to laugh about that VW versus Rambler comment. Very funny! On a serious note my first car actually did have bolt on fiberglass wheel arches, a massive, again, bolt on bonnet scoop, and a big spoiler on the back. For some reason every weekend night the police used to pull me over and do a license and registration check... I can't imagine why... After a while I started getting mildly unnerved by the circumstances. It looked like: this, except that it was bright snot green coloured. The bright green colour should have been a dead give away that it was trouble because that thing combined with AC/DC's classic album "Back in Black" were present at the site of the inevitable accident. James Bond would have been far cooler than I (but I appreciate the thought), although he too would have smashed his old Aston Martin DB9 had he been listening to that classic album. After the smash, I completely lost interest in cars and swapped that beast for a Suzuki 1 litre four speed thing. It didn't go anywhere at all fast and that is a good thing. My mates gave me heaps about the abrupt change. Those cheeky scamps were not very polite about my new wheels...

Yeah, he didn't have a clue at all. And it occurred to me that if I had rang him up he would have politely pretended that nothing at all was said, and then he would retreat back into his preferred narrative. It is the abandoned centre that I really worry about. Hey, there is a book idea in there... What could we title it? Hmmm, comments that I felt would be a really really bad idea to post on the ADR blog. It doesn't quite have the snappy title that one would expect though. Have you got any ideas? Remember to keep them family friendly!!! Hehe! I thought of some not so family friendly titles. For some strange reason, they instantly jump into your mind. It is amazing how those trolls can really derail and otherwise blossoming comment section. I do not write for (or read) poorly moderated websites.

Oh, I noticed that too. What a great idea, otherwise the pay would have been consumed on site. Isn't it interesting how little pay was required for a weeks pay back in those days? The tents in the snow looked unappealing to my mind – and I’ve camped at altitude at about 4,000m (13,200ft) above sea level. The nights were surprisingly cold and the clothes froze every night.

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Do you reckon that is the case because water is so precious to agriculture and survival? Eventually I reckon, I may have to sink a well and then line it with rocks. The Romans were far smarter than us on that front. They absorbed as they travelled and conquered. Doesn't that save a lot of local trouble? As to puppy sacrifices, well Mr Poopy is lucky to be alive right now.

Of course you doubled the garlic and I would expect no less from you! Haha! Three cloves not enough! :-)! I won't mention that the garlic crop down here has not been harvested for a few years now. The soil near there smells like garlic. Go figure that one out. The soup sounds very tasty. I'm curious as to your vinegar preference. Do you prefer the white vinegar or the darker balsamic vinegar?

It sounded like a giant problem to me. I mean how can you even do 91 steps in a recipe? Of course as you say, corners can be cut and the ingredients can be changed to protect the innocent. Just remember not to mention the changes to any foodie friends...

On that front things are pretty pragmatic here. I have this sort of feeling that finishing things is a good thing and so I try not to ever start things I don't reckon that I can finish. It took a long journey to get to that point though. I reckon you've hit on a tough subject with that question. To be brutally honest, peoples ability to concern themselves with issues far into the future seems to have become an atrophied facility. That isn't a criticism, I just wonder if the two issues are related, but don't honestly know really and am just sort of thinking out loud.

Hehe! Yeah, you know they pulled that trick after the Black Saturday bushfires showing a house backyard with a fire affected kids play set. It seemed like a new low to me at the time, but it is nice to read that the image has a long and distinguished history. It has been a very wet winter this year.

Out of curiosity, what are you reading at the moment?

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Jo,

I wasn't aware that annual rainfall records were that close to being broken in Tasmania and there are still a few months to go before the end of the year... What amazes me about it is how extreme the dry was at the start of the year.

It has been pretty wet here too, although not quite record breaking (about 1,435mm is the record here). That was a wet year here... I'd never seen so much rain anywhere before and nothing was dry.

Ha! I'd completely forgotten about him, but clearly he is visiting Tasmania. The reference to the Rain God is here: Rob McKenna.

Hope the new garden is getting a good drink? I spotted the first of the tomato seedlings this morning and you may be interested to know that the saved seeds germinated before the purchased seeds...

Cheers

Chris


Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

Thanks for the concern, and it appears as if Jo has correctly identified the particular Rain God over this part of the world! It is impressive just how much heat the bacteria emit. I seem to recall some French dude heated his house over an entire winter by running water pipes through a ten cubic metre batch of compost. The pipes worked like a heat exchanger and they picked up the heat as water travelled through the hot mass of compost. A simple and effective system.

Fair enough. Power and influence can be used for altruistic motives, no doubts about it and I applaud your motives. Yeah, not playing the game comes with costs, but it does make life simpler and easier and few people want to talk about that. And of course the game is established to consume your time, resources and wealth. That isn't a small cost, from my perspective anyway.

I hope you are correct too. If you are curious, I tend to get people in social circumstances like groups start talking by engaging with them and making sure everyone feels connected to the larger group. And then I let them go. But I'm also prepared to stomp them (politely of course) if they go on overly long. You can usually tell that when other people in the group start to lose a feeling of connection to the conversation. Some people can't see that though. Thanks for the disclosure too as I'd wondered about that with you as I can sort of see it in your writing. It talks to me. My mum exhibited a lot of the conditions of that spectrum although I do not, but I do understand it. It is amazing how many people that I've known over the years with that particular gift - it would have been nicer if they hadn't all largely worked in IT... Far out… That is intended as an observation and also information for yourself and not as any form of criticism as everyone is different and they all bring different skills and experiences to the table.

Exactly, your mind is open to new ideas and understanding and it hones your mind like a tool. People that tend to have an idea and then try and twist their narrative to explain that idea even when it doesn't apply to the world as it is experienced sort of annoy me. You know, gifted programs don't tend to produce people who function really well in the world and sometimes, I've observed that they are crushed by the weight of theirs or other people’s expectations. The fact that you missed out was probably a good thing as you avoided that fate.

It varies of course and you never know how many people will turn up and it takes consistency to build a group (well, I reckon that it does anyway).

Ha! What a great observation. Einstein had something to say about that too. :-)! You have a pragmatic demeanour which is why I asked you the question. Incidentally I'm really appreciative of your response which I need to dwell upon for a day and I promise to reply to it tomorrow. It's good!

Cheers

Chris

TalkingTrees said...

Hello

Lew, my dad busked with his tenor banjo, playing blues and jazz throughout the small towns of Victoria during the Great Depression. His family were professional classical musicians and there were no jobs for such artistic types at that time. He and his dad travelled from convent to convent, priory to priory, tuning pianos - apparently the Roman Catholoc Church still had money and my family name is Irish so they were favoured but they were actually Methodists from the Cornish tin mines, where the Wesley brothers preached. My dad's humorous and somewhat bitter take on it many years later was that he had been thrown out of more towns for busking than I had ever visited.

Chris, we have a rabbit problem! Ugh! It is holding up our garden work just a tad. Our new house yard fence needs a ground skirt. My husband damaged his knee in the garden and has surgery on Monday, consequently He's unable to work on the fence. It will go much more slowly with only me to do the job if I can even manage it alone. And then there is the rain. I'm not partial to working in the rain either. We have been to town today to stock up for a three week period because it is illegal to drive for two weeks post-op. We're thinking it is a trial run for the times we can no longer afford fuel to get to town. No, really, I have never driven and so we've needed to make a plan.

Oh, I would gleefully feed those rabbits to meat eating visitors but we have never managed to catch one in our humane trap. I have an excellent slow cooked Greek rabbit stew. I suppose I could also confess that I am a forty years and counting vegetarian but I cook meat for others and make no judgement.

Warm Regards, Helen

margfh said...

Hi WB,

My daughter was in a gifted self contained class when we lived in a very affluent district. I think there were about 15 kids from the entire district. It was a combined 5-6 grade class. She was the only girl in 6th grade so went alone to the big Jr. High in 7th grade. The gifted class was kind of isolated and did their own thing and when she got to 7th grade she had no friends and was ridiculed and bullied. It truly changed her entire life. In retrospect it obviously was a mistake to let her into the program but as a very young parent I had a sense of pride that she was picked - not that I had anything to do with it. She home schools her daughters and her school experience has quite a bit to do with her decision. The district I taught in has a gifted program but not a special class. It was interesting to note that a disproportionate number of students in the program come from one of the very influential families in town. Quite amusing that you were not admitted due to poor handwriting. Cursive writing is no longer taught in most schools anymore.

Oh and that particular daughter is the only one who "gets it" regarding the situation we find ourselves in now. She would be happy to collapse now but her husband is not on board with that at all.

Thank you for sharing that you're autistic. One of my brothers is and I also have a nephew who has Asperger's. Unfortunately my sister and brother-in-law think the road to success is yet another degree when what he needs is social skills. At 27 he finally has his first part time job (while still going to school) and we are all hoping this is a step to a more independent future for him.

Margaret

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, W.B., Yup. I live in Washington State, almost halfway between Portland, Oregon and Seattle, Washington. Close to Interstate Highway 5. Just outside of two small "twin cities", Chehalis and Centralia. Portland is my hometown, but I've been here since '81.

Ohhh. Two thanksgivings! How cool is that? Last year, for the first time in a long time, I hit all the high points. Just by myself, on my own. Well, the cat, the dog and I. The bird (16 pounds), dressing, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. I froze up a lot of the bird in meal sized packets and made a lot of turkey stock. Luckily, where I live I've got a chest freezer. I'm planning on doing it again, this year. Almost time to haul out my Halloween tat. :-).

I see you're "on the spectrum". Your in good company. Chris is right, it can be a gift.

I also have rubbish handwriting. To communicate by hand, I usually have to print it out in big block letters. And even then, sometimes, people claim to not be able to read what I write. The fringe benefit is that I taught myself to type at a very early age and can still bang along at a respectable speed.

Ginger / green tea cheese cake sounds really nice. But my taste buds are a little old and dead and nuance sometimes escapes me. I've tried green tea ice cream a couple of times, and the flavor is lost on me. Somewhere I've got a recipe for green tea biscuits.

Just a suggestion for your Green Wizard group. If you hit a lull. You can always dip into Greer's "Green Wizardry" book. Discuss what things are plausible in town ... which are not. LOL. There's also a section in there on cooking with a hay box. A lot less messy than ... messing about with compost. Lew



LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - No good titles come from a family friendly stance. I really don't believe that, I'm just sending you up a bit :-).

I usually use white vinegar or apple cider vinegar. I don't use balsamic vinegar. LOL, it's really a reverse snobbism. To me, the idea of flavored vinegars is just so .... twee. So "hipper than thou." But I was just talking about something related to my friend Scott, the other day. Let's see if I can explain this and make sense.

I've never cared for what we call recliners. They're kind of big overstuffed chairs that usually tilt back so that your feet are elevated. "Lazy Boy" is a big brand, over here. Some come with all kinds of "extras." They heat, they massage. They have cup racks. Any-who. I've never imagined a recliner in my future. To my taste, reverse snobbism, I know, they were just too ... "Dad." Too lower class. Too Joe Six-Pac. Well. When I moved in here, there was a ratty old recliner. It's now My Chair. My favorite place to perch. I'm afraid when I move to the new digs, I'm going to have to put a recliner on my furniture shopping list. Sigh. I've joined the middle class. It's hard to maintain your "cool" lolling around with your feet up in a recliner.

Having never bought into the Culture of the Child, the drowned or burnt swing sets have little impact. I don't see any bloated, floated or burnt little corpses, lying about, so the littler blighters must have made it out o.k..

Gee. What I'm reading now. And, I am reading a lot. Right now, my hold list from the library is full of this series or that on DVD. Everything from "Walking Dead" to "Murdoch Mysteries." But not a single DVD is on offer, as they'll all straggle in from here to March. But, there's plenty to read. I'm dipping into "From Hardtack to Home Fries" (Haber), "The Third Plate: Field Notes on the Future of Food" (Barber) and "Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture" (Mendelsohn).

Going back to the library, today, are David Foster Wallace, "Consider the Lobster" and Dr. Michael Greger's "How Not to Die."

Am also dipping into two David Libovitz books, "Sweet Life in Paris" and "My Paris Kitchen."

Well, it's off to my weekly trip to the Little Smoke. Lew



Pam in Virginia said...

Hi, Chris!

The "Curse of Cherokee" held so much promise - and it did not disappoint! Such a winter, and now such a spring of rain! It's pretty great that you have had such good opportunities to observe how your swale(s) works. I suppose that there is not too much worry about fires at the moment? We have 2 natural springs on our property that, like yours, only appear when there has been a massive amount of rain. I have marked ours, also, and have even tried digging into them, but I have not come up with anything so far. I am not a very good digger. I need a wombat, maybe? Or a Toothy? It is interesting that the photo of the depression holding water has leaves on the bottom of it. Is this a clue, or is it just pure clay under that? Our clay soil, when compacted, will hold water only too well.

What a neat egg experience. I have never heard of that happening. In the winter we compost in a large covered plastic bin (with holes drilled in the top) on the front porch in the sun as it is too icky and cold to haul kitchen waste to the garden very often. The lid keeps neighbors' dogs out of it and the heat in. It gets really warm inside that box and I was going to ask you if you had ever heard of anyone heating a greenhouse that way, then you mentioned the French dude. Real green wizardry!

That terrace becomes more impressive each week and the Echiums, Leucadenrons, and Irish strawberry tree DO look good!

We are finishing up the fall plantings - except for garlic, which is next month - of kale, collards, lettuce, and Daikon and other radishes. The tomatoes, even after all of their disease problems, are still producing quite a bit. My, did we eat a lot of tomatoes! I think they have a lot of Vitamin C? I hope so. The peppers are still going really strong, and we finally have a year with some grapes. And late green beans are doing well. Half of the garden is covered in butternut squash and sweet potato vines. I have no idea what to do but give them their own gardens next year . . . it remains to be seen if there are actually any sweet potatoes under the soil; they are harvested, and cured, next month. Something ate our few figs, though; however, it is a beautiful tree and just worth having for that reason.

That would have been one wild car - especially in bright green! That Young Chris brings a smile to my face!

I have seen an awful lot of Footy lately . . .

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Lew:

We have cherry volunteers, too. I put stuff up to freeze and some of it eventually ends up in the bottom of the chest freezer in the basement, and who knows what is down there?

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Helen:

Are those "English" walnuts? We have wild native walnut trees that are Black Walnuts; there is virtually no way to get the "meat" out of them. The green hulls do make a nice brown dye, however. We need to plant some domesticated walnuts since the wild ones are so easy to grow here. We have planted some pecans, which I think are related to the native hickories which grow so prolifically in our woods.

Pam

Pam in Virginia said...

@ W.B.:

In the culture that I grew up in, owning a house WAS normal. I knew no-one, except for some newlyweds and a few young singles, who rented. This was a pretty well-to-do neighborhood, in a pretty prosperous time. I am afraid that quite a few of my Boomer generation grew up under those conditions; not all, of course. And don't forget Hollywood! Who better to put delusions of grandeur into people's heads? As a side note, my husband and I are the only ones in the entire family (our parents included) who actually own our home outright; the rest rent their homes. Unfortunately, I am afraid that my age group, just because we were able to meet certain expectations, have tried to pass those desires on to our children. I don't know if our two sons expect to buy property. They will inherit this homestead; could be way down the road - I hope!

Pam

SLClaire said...

Hi Chris,

Just as you started your tomato seeds, I took all the remaining tomato plants out of my garden. Most years, I wouldn't have done that this early. The plants would have had lots of green tomatoes on them, some of which would have sized up and ripened before frost. I don't expect frost for at least another month, although to be sure anytime in October the possibility for frost exists here. But this year, half the plants have died and there were only a handful of small green tomatoes plus one half-ripened tomato remaining. Looking it over, I felt the better thing to do would be to compost the vines so I'd be ready to sow a rye-vetch cover crop mix next week, once the current heat wave ends. The rescued half-ripe tomato sits on the counter, awaiting its encounter with other salad ingredients.

Because the few remaining pepper plants still have a fair number of large peppers with a good chance of ripening before frost, I left them in. I can sow the cover crop seeds around them.

I'm pondering why the tomato vines died early. Might be due to the several weeks of wet heat that they've been subjected to (lots of rain from July through last week and warmer than normal). Might be because the mid-course gardening corrections I made in the spring put them in a bed that had had solanum-family crops just a couple of years ago. Lots to think and eventually write about.

I have mixed feelings about autumn. On the one hand, I'm not sorry to leave the heat waves of summer behind. We enjoy two months (September and October) of not needing either air conditioning or heat for the most part. I enjoy growing and eating the greens and roots of autumn and enjoy seeing the golden-yellows of goldenrods and the blues and purples of aster blossoms, and the many bees and other pollinators working them. Nature gives us one last show of vibrant color in the turning tree leaves and then their glowing against the greened-up lawn grasses.

But on the other hand, autumn means winter isn't far behind. And winter here means five months of bare trees. Five months of feeling too cold most of the time. Five months of general grayness and brownness. While I'm less badly affected by the lack of light and color than I was when I was younger - more comfortable with the realization that rest and death are part of the natural cycle - it's still not my favorite part of the cycle.

The heat wave we are in now isn't a heat wave by summer standards; it's more like average July heat (high near 90F), coming when the average high is supposed to be in the upper 70sF. The lows are cool enough to not need air conditioning. The new back porch aka three season room is complete enough to use and we are making good use of it! Right now all the windows are open to let air in, but as autumn goes on, we can close the windows and still enjoy the views of my herb garden and nearby shrubs and small trees.

Lew - no one in this house would ever make anything from a recipe with 91 ingredients! Like you, we typically make changes in a recipe to substitute for things we don't have on hand, or to increase the amount of garlic (you're right, three cloves of garlic wasn't enough for that soup) or something else, or decrease something, or leave something out, or add something ... we cook so much that we have a good feel for how ingredients act in a recipe. Yesterday I made carrot cake for Mike (his birthday is today, and it's his favorite cake). The change I made was to halve the recipe. He's in the process of losing weight that he needed to lose, so he wanted some carrot cake but not too much. I was happy to make it for him. Much better than store-bought!

Claire

Pam in Virginia said...

Chris:

Hotdog, Chris! Exciting stuff in your homeland!

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2016/sep/21/indigenous-australians-most-ancient-civilisation-on-earth-dna-study-confirms

Pam

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Helen,

Rabbits are not good for a garden. Are the rabbits digging burrows nearby? I forget whether you have dogs, as they would be all too happy to spend the day chasing rabbits? Sorry to say it, but I fully expect a locust plague too come summer, given what happened the last time we had such a wet year. But then all things are subject to change and they might not get enough sun and heat to get to plague proportions. Dunno.

A ground skirt on a fence is an excellent idea to stop rabbits and other nuisances. Some of the black and white footage from the Depression era of rabbits in the landscape looked like a horror film... Sorry to hear about your husbands injury and I send him best wishes for a speedy recovery. I too worry about injuries on a farm as they can happen very quickly. It is one of the reasons I tend to avoid very heavy machinery.

And yeah, it is still raining today here too, but possibly much worse up your way from what I was reading? I'm not kidding when I tell you how far behind we are this season because of the rain - I should be in the forest right now cleaning up. Oh well. The berry beds are calling…

Fair enough, not everyone wants to drive or even cares to do so. I can usually go about six weeks in between shopping and market runs nowadays and I spend a little bit less each time. Learning how to do so is not as easy as it first appears!

Oh yeah, rabbit pie is superb! Yum! I reckon it is the best way to eat rabbit. I'm a mostly vegetarian too and have been for many years now. It isn't really the great hardship that people make it out to be is it? Well done to you for pursuing that for forty years and having a good attitude about it too. Respect.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Margaret,

Thanks for sharing your experience with your daughter and I must say that I am sorry to hear how it turned out for her. The expectations of others can be a crushing weight and the lack of support network among her own peers would have been very tough on her.

I realise you were discussing the issue with W.B, but I do wonder about that lack of education for the cursive writing skills nowadays and I'm in two minds about it (so to speak). Dunno.

Chris

margfh said...

Hi Chris,

Thanks for your thoughts regarding my daughter. She is quite an interesting person but lacks confidence. She does an excellent job homeschooling. It's a job I wouldn't have been able to tackle. She also, however, hasn't taught the girls cursive writing. I plan to ask them if they're interested in learning to do it next time I see them. I suppose schools think that cursive writing isn't necessary anymore as so much is done on computers and that's "progress". What happens when a signature is necessary?

The amount of technology used now is mind boggling. One of reasons I don't sub anymore is I wouldn't know how to use much of it. Kids are now being assigned chrome books and do much of their homework on them. Smart boards are used instead of black boards or even white boards. Sigh.

Margaret

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

Messing about with compost... is messy! :-)!!! Oh, the manure I have to handle over the years. A hay box cooker probably smells far nicer too? One memorable load of manure released so many spores that I ended up with pink eye… Maybe it was good for my immune system, but then again, maybe not…

And yeah, society really needs a greater diversity of opinions, stories and perspectives right now. Mate the number of boards I had to deal with back in my corporate days which appeared to have been hijacked by a single personality type and I was the only dissenting voice which was quietly ignored (or also hijacked too, often to my sheer annoyance). W.B's gift is in analysis and that stands out to me in his writing.

You are very cheeky! Consider yourself reprimanded for that! Hehe!!! ;-)! I do so enjoy our dialogue. That is just too funny. You know I see that family friendly contradiction in the national youth broadcaster down here. I enjoy the tension that it brings because the songs can contain all manner of non-family friendly content - and I'm totally cool with that - but the presenters themselves don't appear to enjoy the same freedom of expression and they have to dance around and there are amusing disclaimers before the songs. It is all quite amusing to me and I reckon they have struck a nice balance. I appreciate you sending me up a bit too, I mean who wants a big head as it just makes it hard to get through doorways? Hehe!

Well, I did have an underlying interest in that particular question because, well, I don't actually enjoy balsamic vinegar at all and to me it smells like really dirty, five day old socks. Maybe even ten days of hot weather and no change just because the person was slightly perverse, continuously worn socks. At this point, I should add that being a mostly vegetarian I usually have no noticeable smell. Anyway back to the main rant: for some strange reason, restaurants appear to be adding it into perfectly good salads, and once that stuff is on any form of plant material, it is totally impossible to taste anything else. It is twee isn't it? And then some.

Ah, yes, the lazy boy is a known quantity down here too. If it means anything to you, I distinctly recall my other granddad in his recliner chair as he held court in the living room of that house usually watching the footy or the races. And he never moved out of the chair. Curious minds felt that he did not go to the toilet enough as how could one do that and spend so long in that chair. He must have been a prodigy or a giant bladder or something like that. It even had the impressive to a young child lever action which brought out the foot rest. Fortunately for him, I was clever enough to understand that it would be a bad thing for me to disassemble the reclining chair just to see how the levers worked (but I was tempted all the same). Anyway, the impressive and also very old lemon tree in the backyard always called to me more and I spent my days climbing in and among those branches. Don't stress, take the recliner with you when you move and hopefully they'll never notice the loss?

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Those photos I reckon are designed to produce an emotional response, don't you reckon? I sometimes believe that it is the incorrect response to a situation which sort of leads people to believe that a situation is inevitable rather than anything we can actually do something about. That I reckon is the key to the whole tragic image. Anyway, I don't have children and most likely never will. Life deals you cards and that is what you have to play. Of course the kids in the photo made it out OK - most of the time.

Oh, I have heard of the Walking Dead and given that you are watching it I am interested to hear whether you are enjoying the story? Curious minds are also very interested to know whether you would ever consider replicating a hardtack biscuit (jaw notwithstanding, of course) recipe. Maybe Beau could offer his services in this regard? Mind you, dogs also appear to be most un-fussy about things that they put in their mouths and so their opinions are perhaps not to be trusted. And what is the future of food? I do hope that they are not pushing the concept of soylent, which some people are consuming right now (although not the people derived variety). There are lots of problems with that stuff from what I've heard. Did Mendelsohn consider the punks to be the barbarians? Hmm, I reckon you may be in for a treat with the Wallace book, but I defer to your opinion in the matter. Anyway, the essay titled: "Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think" should be a real hoot. He had a very dark view on the world, and very dry humour, but with no support structures around him it must have been hard on him.

Enjoy your trip into the little smoke and sleep comfortably knowing that alas it is still raining here! ;-)!

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Pam,

I'm glad that the story did not disappoint! Of course, there is a little bit of over ambition and also lack of realism about the prevailing weather conditions too in that particular story, but then we are all subject to nature are we not?

Yeah, the swale is a ripper and I got the local earthworks guy to dig it out when he cut the house site into the side of the hill. Oh, for an excavator! Anyway, he took a bit of convincing, but the thing really does work. No, the fire threat will hit here in force by about New Years Day. Of course, all things are subject to change in that regard. The Eucalyptus leaves will burn green because of the high oil content, although the local forest smells beautiful as a consequence.

Well done marking the springs out and my gut feel is that in the far future, such knowledge will be very handy. Digging is very hard work and you never really know where the water table actually is! The Aboriginals used to sink wells all over the country so as to have access to fresh water, where they weren't capturing it in small ponds dotted about the landscape. Water is a big issue, no doubts about it and I am truly glad to read that you are thinking about it. I would be happy to lend you an overactive and seriously grumpy wombat? Mind you, they have bad attitude plus at the moment because of the persistent rain and I have seen them out at night eating in the rain which indicates to me how hungry they must be. Poor things.

I don't know the answer to that question about the organic matter in the water and am going to watch the site off and on again in the future to see how it goes. You are lucky to be able to have ponds in your location. I have a lot to learn about that issue.

Oh yeah, could you imagine using the free heat from that compost over the winter to warm a greenhouse? I honestly can't recall who the French dude was who conducted that experiment. Obviously ten cubic metres (13 cubic yards) of manure is a lot of manure. It is pretty clever though isn't it?

Thanks on both counts. I've been wondering whether I should just let the echiums take over that flower bed as the bees love the flowers so much? Dunno. Hopefully the terrace finishes over the next day or so.

Nice to read about your solid harvests and the tomatoes sound particularly nice. Honestly, I have no idea what vitamins the fruit has. You may be interested though to know that the saved tomato seeds germinated far faster and in far greater numbers than the purchased seed, so I'd recommend saving some seed from the hardiest if you have the time? That is interesting that you have grapes but the tomatoes struggled. Interesting. Of course, good producers need their own gardens. Anyway, I am planting the pumpkins (squash) in their own garden this year too, so I have taken a leaf from your book. Yeah, figs are great looking trees and the jam from the fruit is excellent.

Hehe! Glad you enjoyed the car and the story. The A9X racing version could hit about 260km/h (161 m/h) back in the day and I used to sneak into the Sandown Park race track with my mates as a young kid and watch them go. It was a ripper and I loved to get my head under the bonnet and fix it up (well, make it go faster really). Good fun! They don't make them like that these days.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Claire,

Well, that tomato removing story just goes to prove that you have no "ruth"! Of course the best gardeners with vegetables are ruth-less and I hear you about removing the tomatoes. Sometimes the conditions just aren't right and removing them all is the best thing to do. Yes, and your idea about the rye-vetch mix is outstanding. We grow that mix (they may add oats here too) down here as a green manure crop. Your garden and soils are seriously in for a treat. Those plants will self sow too after a while. I've noticed a huge patch of sweet pea growing here and it is feral and naturalised... Ha! I like the use of the word "encounter". Very funny!

It may be interesting to see whether the cover crops increase the warmth around the peppers? I don't know as it is a bit too cool for peppers here, but I'm experimenting yet again this year and of course I have probably been growing the wrong varieties.

I was wondering about your tomatoes too. If it means anything to you, I'd probably rule out soil deficiencies as I plant tomatoes in the same soil year in and year out and you have that under control. My gut feel is the transition between really damp and then really dry is tough on such plants. I tend to keep them on the drier side of things and under water rather than over water. It is hard though, oh, and I stick to cherry to mid sized tomatoes as they are more reliable and tastier. Dunno though, just a few random thoughts and I'd be very interested to read your thoughts on the subject.

Yeah, autumn is like a mini-spring! Yay! Ouch, you have a very long winter. But then winter is down time in the garden (unless your winters are mild like here) and time to relax. Sorry, I am just enjoying a homemade ortolana pizza whilst replying! Yum! And it reminds that I need to get the potatoes in now... It is high summer for me when the UV hits extreme and the afternoons are unbearable and there is the threat of fires that I find the least appealing. Still, what will be, will be.

Your three season room sounds very nice and I reckon it is an excellent addition to your house. Such a smart idea to be able to let the air move in, or not as the weather demands. We sat outside tonight on the veranda which shelters us from the rain and enjoyed an after work coffee in the 5'C (41'F) dusk. Brrr! A three season room would have been a bit nicer. My limit is about 2'C (35'6'F) before I suggest we go inside. :-)!

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Pam,

Thanks for the link. It is pretty awesome isn't it? I really enjoyed the line:"Now we know their relatives are the guys who were the first real human explorers. Our ancestors were sitting being kind of scared of the world while they set out on this exceptional journey across Asia and across the sea.”

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

Thanks for the clear thought. You have a gift for analysis, did you know that? I've known people with that and it is useful.

What you describe as tension is the cognitive dissonance between how people believe the world to work and how it works out in practice. I hadn't considered applying that perspective to the housing situation, but I reckon you are correct. Thanks, I appreciate that. It takes me a while to absorb new insights like that into what I call "my worldview". I tend to think in terms of stories and it helps me build a story on the why of things.

Ha! Nothing is for free... Hehe! Well, the answer to that question depends on who turns up and also why they turn up to the meeting. I can't answer that question really because it depends on what an individuals capabilities are and what their personal goals are. I'll tell you a little story:

"Men in general judge more by the sense of sight than by the sense of touch, because everyone can see but only a few can test by feeling. Everyone sees what you seem to be, few know what you really are; and those few do not dare take a stand against the general opinion."

That was written by Niccolo Machiavelli, in The Prince. And it is also far closer to a description of me than I am comfortable with. It is akin to meeting a genuinely poor priest! Hehe!

Many people are clearing their conscience, others are blocking paths and I see all sorts of stuff going on in society. And I'm cool with that as mostly it is self defeating and it all has a finite end point before reaching a new equilibrium. The thing is, you are asking questions that lead to difficult answers and that in itself is a sort of initiation really and you have to be careful that you can observe your responses and emotional reactions but also maintain a sort of cool detachment so that it is not overwhelming on your senses. That is one reason I always felt that JMG sort of indicates that an individuals works are a buffer against such pitfalls. If you want to lead, well my experience is that you kind of have to lead by example, even if it is only what you consider to be small things, if you know what I mean.

What a tough question you posed! Well done.

Oooo ginger is really nice and I can imagine it in a cheesecake. Yum and very zingy! Yeah, the 91 step dessert was what is known as a "neg" in that it operates to make you feel inadequate. How good could the thing taste anyway? ;-)!

Apples are good indeed. And a very old and important fruit too. Did you know that most apples have a use in either: Fresh eating; cooking; or brewing? I get fruit all year around here because of the citrus crops over winter and they are a morning food for me.

Cheers

Chris

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Well, I'm quite popular here right now. If I miss someone, I'm sincerely sorry, but I don't have time to read all the comments and do everything else I need to do.

Chris,

Well, it's abundant heat, so it makes sense to try to use it. Of course, I'm sure lots of people freak out when they find out where the heat comes from, but if it's set up right, there'd be no leakage, and it would be safe. Well, it's another idea to explore. I have too many at the moment, so I'm going to have to focus, but this looks like a really good one, if it works in practice.

Well, power and influence are nice, but the costs are, to put it mildly, excessive. The benefits are quite a lot, and the costs in not playing the game at all are also a lot. I'm curious though if these costs are put in place to prevent more people from dropping out, but I'm not sure how to go about checking that idea.

That's a good way to approach a group. Personally I like to talk a fair bit, especially in a smaller group, but I can see the benefits to letting people talk. I was paying attention, making sure everyone got a chance to talk, and we did a good job of letting everyone speak. I think we all were watching this, but it's nice to have what seems to be a good group.

Autism is far more common than people think, I just find a lot of us don't like talking about it. I figured I'd get a feel for this group, then mention it. I find a lot more people have some traits of it as well: it's both good and bad, as with almost everything, the trick is to figure out how to maximize the good and minimize the bad. I'm curious, if you know, what made you think I might be on the spectrum?

Yes, the more I look at it, the less and less irritated I am that I didn't get in. It's funny, but at the time I was quite upset, but now, the feeling is mostly relief. And I have a kid in the gifted program in a group I work with, I can see a lot of problems come out of it now, but it was hard to see until I started to get to know kids in the gifted program and could compare them to their peers.

Well, I hope it works out. If not, I'll have a few more skills and ideas to start something else up later.

Well, I think for lots of people it's easier to try to change reality than to change your mind. Having been beat many times with reality where my trying to ignore something didn't make it go away, I think it's a bad idea, and try to change my mind when things don't fit.

Margaret,

One of the kids I volunteer with might be in a situation a little like your daughter's. I hope not, she's a good kid, but the gifted program isolates people, one of the many things I have against it. She's lucky in that she has a bunch of friends through the scouting program, but I haven't heard her talk much about school friends, so I wonder a little. And it is very amusing writing kept me out of it. Oddly, my writing improved a lot right after the test, such that I could have gotten in. I think this is yet another case where I got incredibly lucky without knowing it at the time.

Yes, social skills are key. However, they're also neglected in most programs available for us. Why, I don't know, but my experience is that social skills are given far less importance than they realistic should have. Society in general seems to dislike social skills like politeness though, so it may be related to that.

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Lew,

Well, I'm glad to see I was right. And two thanksgivings are pretty nice, I just wish the American one was on a Friday instead of Thursday. It would make my schedule a lot nicer most years. But, quirks such as this are a part of life. And freezing isn't needed with my family, but I think it's unlikely you eat as much as the five of us, so a chest freezer sounds nice.

Yes, it's funny how few people can read my writing. I'm sure if letters were more common, it would be easier. There are some people who can't read cursive at all anymore, which seems fairly odd to me.

Green tea ice cream is a little hard to do well. There's a fine line between "Is there green tea?" and "Wow, this is too strong", and I find almost none is in the range where you can taste it, but it's not overwhelming.

Compost cooking is mostly an idea because I expect things to get quite bad for a little while, and I want to have ideas for worst case scenarios. A hay box is a good idea, and I fully intend to read the book. Next time, we plan to discuss what skills we have we can teach each other, what we all lack and want to learn, and sort out how to figure these things out.

Pam,

I'm pretty sure there was a point where it was normal, but the problem is it's not anymore. Losing sight of the fact things change, and can for the worse, is a huge problem. And media has a large impact on things, I keep forgetting how much it does. Oh Hollywood...

Chris (again),

Worldviews tend to be very stable, or incredibly fragile. I'm still rebuilding mine, from myth of progress to myth of collapse (myth meaning organizing story, not thing that's not true), which is probably why I have such a gift for insight right now: it's easy to see things in a new light when even how you think is brand new to you!

That short description is really good! I'm going to have to mull over it for a few days before I know what to make of it entirely though.

Everything eventually moves to a new equilibrium, it's just a question of getting there. And I think JMG stresses action because waiting for a group is often an excuse to do nothing. And absolutely, however it's also nice to see where others are going as well, since I may not always see the wall or cliff in front of the path of I'm on. As always, balance is key.

I'm trying to figure it out myself. I don't want the group to turn into an empty formalism, an excuse to feel good, because I know it would be very easy... So I'd like to hear what the other groups are doing to borrow ideas.

I doubt it would taste good: even if the recipe is good, there are too many ways to mess it up!

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ Helen - My mother didn't learn to drive until she was in her 50s. We moved out of town, into what was then country. It was either learn to drive or be "stuck" a good part of the time.

@ Claire - A friend took me to lunch the other day. It was a buffet kind of place. I went for the carrot cake. Which was very good. But it wasn't much bigger than two lumps of sugar! Still, it was very good and as I've packed on a bit of weight since my surgery, not a bad thing. Lew

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - I was just reading an article the other day that in the early days of the internet, trolls were rather ... prankish. Now, they seem to be truly horrible. But more on tech, later ...

Actually, I think being cleaver, entertaining AND family friendly really takes a lot more talent and effort than just descending into a bad case of potty mouth. But sometimes you just want to let fly ...

Interesting what you said about balsamic vinegar and old gym socks. I've always had an aversion to minestrone soup, as I've always thought it was evocative of a redolent adolescent boys locker room. But maybe that's just me. Speaking of smell, I've got this 2 gallon + bucket of quince, and have decided what to do with them. But just about everything I read comments on the odor of quince when they're ready to turn into something wonderful (and how hard they are to cut). But so far, I detect no wonderful odor from the quince. They came off the tree quit easily, so I figure they were ready to pick. But so far, no odor. Perhaps they're like pears and need to sit around awhile? But even the first one I picked a week ago has no smell.

Oh, I'll leave the recliner behind. It really is ratty and not a color I care for. Come to think of it, my grandfather was also pretty much moored to his chair. But back in the dark ages, before recliners (the 1950s) one made due with a well padded rocking chair and a foot stool.

Hmmm. Both the Wallace book and "Waiting for the Barbarians" were collections of essays. And, like a magpie, I just pick and chose the bright shinny one's that catch my interest. :-). I loose patience with Wallace. Early on, he's a pretty good essayist, but what starts out as the occasional footnote ends up sprawling across his essays and subsumes whatever it was he wanted to say. From my point of view. I really don't know if he initially just wanted to make sure he was understood ... or if it became a kind of precious gimmick. Some of his later stuff looked more like a flow chart than anything literary.

Mendelsohn I was unfamiliar with. I guess he writes for mostly east coast periodicals. NY Review of Books, NY Times, etc.. He had three sections in his book. Essays on pop culture (the Spider Man broadway disaster ... why the Titanic catches the popular imagination) a section on critiquing new translations of classics (Homer, Sappho) and a section on critiquing authors (Sontag, Noel Coward). Some I read and some I didn't. Did it make me a better informed person? Well, I suppose so. But, I have to ask myself how much I'll remember a week from now. And, it's not like I have anyone in my life to hash all this stuff out with. And who remembers who Sontag or Coward are, anyway? Cont.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Cont. I keep dipping into "The Third Plate", on and off. What's interesting is some of the things I've found out about wheat. Wheat, as it was originally grown is a perennial crop. With roots that can be as long as 8 feet. We've developed wheat into an annual crop with very shallow roots. Sure, it boosted yield, at the expense of what it did to the land and to the taste of the wheat.

The author of "From Hardtack to Home Fries" is "the Curator of Books at the Schlesinger Library at Harvard University's Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies." This collection includes 16,000 cookbooks and piles of other documents, such as, Julia Child's papers, etc.. The book is really snapshots of different food ways in American history, and what they have to say about what was going on in American food at the time, and how that impacted the direction of foods. Civil War hospital food and kitchens. The craze for diet reformers (Kellogg, Graham, et all). Why the food in the FDR White House was so bad, and what that has to say about American cooking at that time. Not the first book I've read on American food and cooking. Not the worst, not the best.

So, "The Walking Dead." Well, I don't know what's up with me, but lately I've been loosing interest in keeping up with these tv series. I have season 5 of Walking Dead (or, is it season 6?) on hold, but I just can't seem to work up much excitement to watch the darn thing. And, it's not just Walking Dead. It's several other series I've been following. Maybe I've been spending too much time reading the ADR? :-). Or, when you're 67 you start thinking more about what you do with your time :-).

I thought this weeks ADR was pretty good and even followed the link to reread the "Heresy of Technological Choice" post. That's the one where the couple that live pretty Victorian were getting a lot of flack. What I hadn't trigged to, at the time, is that they live in Port Townsend. Which we were talking about a couple of weeks ago.

I guess the idea of technological choice is resonating with me, right now, as I'm going to be coming up on some turning points. When I move into The Home, do I want to get rid of the truck? It certainly is tempting. Just about everything I really need is within walking distance. And, there's a good local in town bus service that stops right in front. And, things to decide about how much and in which direction I want to go as far as a computer is concerned. Laptop? Stick with Apple or get something generic and figure out Linux? To keep it family friendly, I don't know weather to poop or go blind :-).

Ah, yes. Heating with compost. Can be done. I know we've talked here before about Victorian green houses heated with compost. Growing pineapples, etc.. Of course, to be resilient, you need a good source of on site compost. Large animals or dependable bio mass. Lew

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Helen:

I am so sorry to hear about your husband's knee. All the best to him on Monday.

I am a vegetarian, too, and I also often cook meat for others. No problems there.

@ Lew:

"To my taste, reverse snobbism, I know, they were just too ... "Dad." " Have you ever watched the British comedy from the early '90s called "Dad", with George Cole? It is so hilarious.

Pam

TalkingTrees said...

Hello

A plague of locusts after a prolonged wet period would be a nasty event. Just as well our bird population has noticeably increased over the past couple of years. Driving through clouds of locusts is a very messy business. Last time there were swarms of locusts in our region people put guards on the front of their vehicles.

You know Chris we can buy farmed rabbit at the farmers market in town. We don't though because it is an insipid pink colour and I just don't believe it would have much flavour and it was around $23 last time I looked. We do have a couple of rabbit warrens on our farm, one was destroyed when the site for our new house was bulldozed but the vacuum that made was soon filled by more rabbits. They tend to stick to the creek banks and love a good blackberry patch.Thanks for the good wishes for a speedy recovery for my husbands surgery.

Pam, all I can tell you about the walnut trees on our farm is that they are not black walnuts. The bark is almost completely smooth. I've always assumed it was a white walnut but once the leaves appear and the nuts over the next months I'll pay close attention and see if I can work out a variety. Thanks for your good wishes. My husband is a good patient and as this is a simple repair he will hopefully be active again quite quickly.

Warm Regards, Helen

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B, Lewis, and Helen,

Thanks for the lovely comments, but after a day of digging, I am exhausted. I promise to reply to your comments tomorrow evening and hopefully I won't spend all day tomorrow digging... The new garden terrace is coming along and the reason for all of the extra digging is because we decided to extend the berry bed and place the raspberries and marionberries in there as well. It just doesn't make much sense making things too small and then regretting that later - been there and done that...

Hi Lewis,

Yeah, I've struggled to get time this week to read the ADR and the other blog so hopefully tomorrow night I can enjoy a nice ginger wine and a good read! I suspect that Wallace was a very anxious person and he used the footnotes as armour. It does make for a tedious reading experience. Maybe a flow chart is the right idea? :-)!

Cheers

Chris

orchidwallis said...

Hello Chris
I haven't vanished, just minus my laptop as an infection had snuck in. It has taken me half an hour to reconnect it as my understanding is limited. Haven't read the blog yet let alone the comments; am trying to catch up on e-mails etc.

Inge

margfh said...

Hi Chris,

The cooked egg was very interesting. What do you use for litter in your coop?

Harvested all the squash and got a great harvest. I planted in the "pig garden", one of the unused pig pens and it had plenty of room to sprawl. Squash bugs can be an issue. I usually scrape off the eggs and kill the adults but with plants this size it becomes an almost impossible task.

Still have greens, brussel sprouts, beets, peapods and a few tomatoes.

The pigs left Wednesday. The one with laminitis made it in and out of the trailer OK. In fact the loading went off without a hitch. The last two years the loading was terrible. Usually it'll be just one pig who won't load. I made sure my husband had enough help this year so naturally he didn't need all of it.

Digging is sure hard work - no wonder you're exhausted.

Margaret

margfh said...

Hi Helen,

Dogs definitely take care of the rabbits though only one of our dogs, Salve, manages to catch them. She often arrives on the scene with a half consumed young rabbit.

I am not fond of driving but where we live it's a necessity. My sister who lives in Chicago stopped driving. I don't drive into Chicago anymore - way too stressful. One of the reasons we moved where we did is that the train's last stop is in our town. I have quite a few family members in Chicago or a close in suburb. Of course with a little planning driving can be cut down to a minimum. When I was a child we often piled in the station wagon just for a drive (all ten of us). My mother loved to drive so my father seldom did the driving when they were together. Of course traffic wasn't as bad and there wasn't so much road rage not to mention texting and talking on the phone.

Hope your husband's surgery goes well and he mends quickly.

Margaret

Pam in Virginia said...

Chris:

The local news today states that this summer our rainfall was 13% below normal and that most of it occurred before the growing season, which sounds right as, until a few days ago, we had a stretch of three weeks without rain - very unusual for us. We also had 42 days of highs at 90 degrees F (32 C) or higher; 30 days is more normal. The stretch of dry weather might account for the fact that our tomato plants, while spending most of the summer in a diseased state, really bounced back during the dry spell (less chance of fungus, etc.).

I plant some cover crops, too - rye and clover and vetch and peas; buckwheat in the summer. I have a problem with vetch. If I don't get it turned under in time it becomes really hard to get rid of and really takes over, and is a perennial. In fact, I absolutely cannot get it out of the raspberry patch, where it moved in. Maybe it's good for them? Maybe I have the wrong vetch?

Pam

LewisLucanBooks said...

@ W.B. - Re: "...maximize the good, etc." I'm quoting from memory, here, but Woody Allen said something like "Seize the opportunities, avoid the pitfalls and be home by 6 in time for dinner." Comparing and sharing skills is a stroke of genius. Dare I say, "Wizard!" Is that a pun? :-).

The big chest freezer here came with the rental. But, I think I rely on it a bit too much. I should do more canning and drying. Three days without power, out here in the boonies, and I'd loose it all. It doesn't feel very resilient. When I move to town, I'm thinking of getting a small freezer, besides the usual fridge. Less chance of being without power, in town, for a long period of time. On the other hand, what with what Chris calls the crapification of everything, how resilient is a new freezer?

@ Pam - Not a series I've heard of. I'll have to see if my library carries it.

Yo, Chris - Well, I thought the berry fortress looked a little on the small side, but just thought a.) Chris knows what he's doing, or b.) it meets Chris' needs.

Also time for the Melbourne Green Wizard meet up. If the flood waters have subsided enough to slog through. I see the group in Melbourne is perhaps getting too big for the venue? Maybe Docklands Stadium (aka Colonial Stadium, aka Telstra Stadium) is available to let? :-). Well, one can dream. Lew

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

Oh, the compost! I liked your comment: "sure lots of people freak out". I took a photo this afternoon as it rained unexpectedly (what a surprise the curse of Cherokee strikes again) of the aftermath of having to shift a huge quantity of manure in the rain. This is not a clean job! I'm considering writing about the issue that you raised on the next blog, but the story needs to develop a bit more. Honestly, the heat from bacterial action really does work. I suspect that the heat and energy released from such bacterial activities is what kept the very hardy survivors of the extinction event of the dinosaurs alive. There would have been a lot of rotting bio-mass which would have kept many species warm during the cloudy period.

I've never noticed the benefits of having power over others as I sort of consider it to be a responsibility and as such the whole issue hits a new equilibrium. As a suggestion, you may want to consider the role that the steward plays?

You seem to have a nice balance with your group and knowing when to shut the suitcase, as sales people say, is a skill worth knowing. I tend to watch people’s reactions closely and you can usually spot pretty quickly how they are feeling via their facial expressions and/or their body language.

As an alternative perspective, your scenario maybe none of their business either? I have known plenty of people over the years on the spectrum and generally they are pretty nice people, although I have techniques which I frequently use to reign them in a bit, without also hurting their feelings. Most of the time they appreciate the assistance as they miss out on cues. Sometimes, if they are recidivists, I can be quite blunt and say: "OK, you have five minutes, get it out of your system". Strangely enough, I have found that that works and they are happy with that limit imposed on them.

Ha! That is funny. What lent me that insight about yourself is that I already provided the answer to you and you completely missed the social cue because it was delivered in a format that does not work for you. No stress, we can discuss that at length as it may give you insights into your interactions with other people. Of course you can always learn and any knowledge is an advantage in life as inevitably life is about other people and our interactions with them. As an interesting side story, when I was a very young adult, by sheer chance, I moved into a share house with a whole lot of people (it was a very big house with a whole lot of problems!) and two of them were ex drug dealers and they took pity on me, probably because I was amusing but also I had a job and therefore money, but I was a bit shy at the time, and more or less they took me under their wing and taught me how to socialise and just talk with anyone. I'm not recommending that you go through a similar process with all its ups and downs, but all things can be learned.

Not getting into that program is akin to dodging a bullet. Seriously, such things do nobody any favours.

Well, let's just say that I have a very flexible mind and it usually takes me about a week to absorb changes delivered via shocks into my worldview. That is a tough week for me though. The first time many long years ago I was trolled on the Internet I was really upset about it, and now I just deal with them as the nuisance they are knowing that they would not dare say such a thing to my face. There are many shocks like that in life and it does assist you to maintain a flexible approach. The reason I was asking you so many questions was that I was concerned that you may have taken the depressive response to the information. Depression is a useful emotional response as it gets people off their backsides, but it can be also indulged and I see a lot of that. I was mildly concerned for your welfare as you approached the information without an initiation and that is not something that everyone can do easily.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

You know, I'd appreciate the original prankster, but alas, they now seem to all have a case of the potty mouth and way bad attitudes. The early days of the Internet were very geeky! I got onto the Internet as the old BBS systems were put to bed. As a bit of a confession, my mates and I used to get onto the old dial up BBS systems and play each other in turn based D&D games. It was a bit like D&D really, except that you'd only get 10 turns each day and woe betide any member of the geek set that didn't happen to log onto the BBS and play their turns... And there was the dark time that I went on holidays for a few days down the coast and one of my mates who also just happened to be dating my flatmate, switched on my computer, logged into the BBS and stripped my character of accumulated gold and other stuff!!! Fortunately, I am of a forgiving nature and I guess I made the mistake of going on holidays! :-)! Such innocent days.

Mate, I totally hear you, sometimes I just want to also let fly and say: What the (insert potty mouth here which may possibly rhyme with the word Truck)? And believe this or not, it actually happened to me yesterday. Someone was criticising me for using local trees as firewood for heating as this is apparently a bad thing and then in the next breath they were telling me about their imminent plans to fly to another country. They really looked at me negatively and I could read their transparent thoughts which were: You are a bad person.

Oh no, different foods can have quite strong reactions in people, although the minestrone soup that I have encountered was actually quite bland. People can rely way too much on flavourings, and I always reckon that if the ingredients are good, fresh, and they sing together in harmony, then how bad can the end result be? Of course some people lack a feel for subtlety and maybe that is why they are so heavy handed. Unfortunately down here, people seem to think that a salad must come with balsamic vinegar nowadays and when I spot those little dark dots of vinegar stench, I just don't want to know about the food. Mind you, the greens I grow and eat are not what other people purchase and consume so maybe they need the balsamic to hide that?

That is rather strange about the quince. I just checked with the editor and we have never known quince fruit to have any strong smell. Of course, people may be allowing the fruit to blet which basically means ferment, much like they do with medlars and persimmons. No please don't let the fruit ferment! They are best cooked when freshly picked, of course they are a cooking fruit and not for fresh eating, although I did see one very unusual person consuming a fresh quince at the Queen Victoria Market and to be brutally honest, that is nasty. :-)! Try a bit of sugar and some cloves and then stew in the oven for a while. Yum!

Thanks for the story of back in the dark ages grandad!!! Very funny. Hey, since you've mentioned the rocking chair, I tend to see a rocking chair in my own future, but on the veranda, and maybe with a shot gun and nice tipple on either side. Of course, I would be grinning whilst rocking backwards and forwards! :-)! You rarely see rocking chairs anymore. They were quite comfortable.

I kind of feel sorry for Wallace as his anxieties shone through to me. It all seemed a bit sad really as he may have had something good to say, which he certainly did, but it was lost in translation and his own insecurities.

Mate, I didn't know either of those bands... I hope they don't come to get you or me!!! Hehe! Who knows what might happen a week from now? At a wild guess, it may be raining here?

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Oh what? No way? Was wheat really originally a perennial? Did you know that there are people searching for that lost holy grail of wheat? No doubts, it would have been probably better for us and the soils. Some of the grasses down here were originally perennials... Our losses are sometimes bigger than we even realise. Oh yeah, Lucerne (or alfalfa) can have roots down to as deep as 20ft. Did I ever mention what happened to the whole bread making product ladies? There was an interesting twist to that story.

I'm not sure I'd want to read Kellog's thoughts as he had some very strange ideas. Really very strange. The history in and of itself of food is quite fascinating, especially as it casts such a big shadow over all our lives. Speaking of which, I managed to plant out the raspberries and about a third of the potatoes today. Why I ever had troubles growing raspberries before is now a total mystery to me. Those plants are totally feral and there were brand new plants everywhere...

Fair enough and thanks very much for the straight answer. I rarely watch anything here anymore. It is hard to know how to spend your life, but there are plenty of options for checking out and television just happens to be one of them. Wallace had that addiction. More confessions... The editor and I went to the films on Wednesday evening to see the Rom Com (yeah, yeah, I know!!!): Bridget Jones Baby. A very delightful English film too, which was also followed by some very tasty pancakes. Yum! I doubt very much whether it would be on your "too watch" list and only mention it, honestly, I don't know why...

Mate, I totally feel for that couple in Port Townsend. They are an affront to other peoples choices and as such it is all about the other people. It doesn't mean that it wouldn't have hurt them though.

Yeah, if you don't need the truck, then that could save you some hard cash. And the walking is a good thing. Everyone sort of makes their own choices in that regard. Damo here recommended the Linux GUI Mint, although you may have to ask him about it. I did notice that he has a new post today from Laos.

That is the trick to compost. Currently I can bring the stuff in. In the future, I dunno really, the plants sort of do their own thing to recycle bio-mass but in order to bring fertility back up the hill, you have to have a fully functioning ecosystem. And that isn't something that most people want to hear.

In that regard Chris has no idea what he is doing!!! Hehe! Thanks the berry bed was on the small side, but after consultation with the editor it has almost doubled in size today, which has resulted in more work... I'm tired.

The Green Wizards meet up was cancelled. Unfortunately due to the short notice I had to decline (which I was very uncomfortable doing) but the guy that runs it also has the dreaded flu which I had a few weeks back. It actually was a flu going around and not just a regular sniffle and cold (which I barely notice). This one was bad. The editor got it bad after me too.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Helen,

Yeah, how bad were the locusts last time? Good for you, those birds will enjoying eating every single one of those locusts. They did here,I could see the locusts jumping down the driveway and the birds cleaned them all up. I couldn't let the dogs out either on the worst day as I could sneak up behind the kookaburras and they were so fat and full of protein, I could just grab them. I'm not sure they appreciated the cuddle...

Wow! $23 per rabbit is quite expensive and the insipid pink may be due to the limited diet that the rabbits enjoyed? Dunno. Have you ever seen a silky chicken with no feathers? Some people would have real problems with a purple chicken, not that they have much meat on them anyway. Did I ever mention that one of the silky chickens here is the second oldest at about 6 and a half years now? They are very hardy.

Yeah, I try to avoid growing blackberry patches and mow them flat when I spot them here. They do leave magnificent soil underneath them though. Incidentally, I'll be training the canes up reinforcing steel, but that maybe won't be installed for about two weeks.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Inge,

Best wishes for a speedy recovery for your laptop! :-)! No worries, catch up when you get the time. It may not surprise you, but it rained again today. And I became covered in manure as I had to move it in the rain. An unpleasant business...

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Margaret,

Yeah, the egg was fascinating and very unexpected. What else is under that deep litter mulch? ;-)! The litter is used bedding straw mixed in with their manure. Isn't it surprising just how much manure chickens can produce? The bedding straw is a sugar cane mulch which I've found that the chickens are less able to kick off their laying boxes.

That is a really good idea with the squash in the previously used pig garden. Nice work and glad to read of your excellent harvest. I'm germinating the melon, zucchini and pumpkin seeds now, but unfortunately the bed that I wanted to plant them in is covered with strawberries. It is a long story...

Yum! Those are all very useful and tasty food plants. Out of curiosity when does your tomato season finish? I'll add a photo of the tomato seedlings on the next blog...

That is life isn't it, but it is always good to be prepared. Did I mention, I spotted a pig loose on a nearby road last week? The extra hands would have been good. Do they age the meat much or is it shipped back straight away?

Yeah, more digging today but I'm almost there... I am a bit tired now.

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Pam,

It is funny that you mention British comedy shows...

That description is that of a tough growing season. Down here that would be a high risk fire season as the early grass would get going, and then dry... Yeah, your tomatoes would have loved the dry weather as long as they can get access to a bit of water. Tomatoes are strange plants like that. The hotter the weather, the more they like it. I have to water them for about 10 minutes per day in such conditions and they tend to wilt a bit by late afternoon. But the upside is the fruit becomes really tasty although did you find them to be a bit smaller than usual? The sugars become more concentrated in the fruit.

Hey, I plant all of those too. Yeah, vetch can turn up again and again. I'm having trouble with sweet pea at the moment as it is feral and can choke out other plants. Did you know all of those green manure crops are best harvested for the benefit of the soil just before they produce seeds? They're still good if they seed, but the fertility improvement is about twenty times less, but still very good. I tend to let them all run to seed just to save me the hassle of resowing them the next year.

My gut feel is that it would be good for the raspberries as they are a more finicky berry and most likely require better feeding than the blackberries. I've been moving raspberries today and they are feral! Sometimes the fruit though tastes a bit insipid to me for some reason and the fruit lacks the full red blush that you would expect. Raspberries are a bit of a mystery to me. Do your raspberries taste good or have as strong a flavour as the blackberries?

Cheers

Chris

margfh said...

Hi Chris,
Tomato season can vary depending on the weather. As it was so humid this year and fairly wet after mid July the tomatoes suffered from blight. I still have some but the numbers are dwindling. I grow this one cherry tomato variety - Sun Gold (a hybrid) which has a fantastic taste but has a tendency to split and with the weather this year there was a period of time that almost all split and attracted lots of insects - not a pretty site. Now though they are still ripening in small numbers and doing much better. We will harvest any green tomatoes when there's threat of frost and ripen in a paper bag.

I asked about your chicken litter because I use wheat or oat straw mostly but as it's pretty long and course really doesn't compost well. I've always used wood shavings for the meat chickens and turkeys as the straw gets so matted down with the massive amounts of their droppings. Often some of the chickens sneak in and do a great job digging around in the shavings so I'm going to at least mix in a bale of them with the straw. I also rake up some dry leaves for winter use as well. I'm hoping this mix will compost better.

Catching a pig is quite a job as they're so smart. My husband didn't latch the gate once when feeding them and a couple took advantage and escaped. It took forever to get them back in. We double latch now.

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Well, the guy that was dinging you about the firewood was a moron. It's all about the sick, momentary thrill of one-upmanship and superiority. I think some of the people over at the ADR are morons. But, I just try and be patient, as, sooner or later they irritate the heck out of Mr. Greer and he shows them the door. Morons. Not to be confused with weirdos :-).

Thanks for the tip about the quince. I think it's about time I do something with them. They've been sitting around on their bums, long enough! I'm going to do an quince / orange spread with some of it, and then I found a real good looking recipe on David Lebovitz's site for poaching quince in honey and using the syrup on .... lots of things. So, I'll give that a whirl, too. But, probably not til early in the week.

Because I got a craving for something else. A craving for something I've never had. How odd is that? Any-who, the church I go to for meetings is also a food bank. Well. Apparently, someone gave them these ENORMOUS boxes full of individual bags of potato chips. Something I really don't snack on. They left us a note to help ourselves. But what popped into my head was ... tuna noodle casserole with a crushed potato chip topping. Retro nostalgic comfort food. :-). So I want to give that a whirl before I slaughter the quince.

Speaking of food, I'd heard rumors ... odd little mentions here and there that one of the universities here was doing something with heritage varieties of wheat. Well, the book "The Third Plate" had quit a bit about it ... and then I ran across an article on the National Public Radio site that led me here ...

http://thebreadlab.wsu.edu/

I just wonder if there's anywhere that the wheat ... or flour can be bought? The problem (if one considers it a problem) is that the wheat berries from the heritage breeds need to be kept on the cool side. And, once they're ground, need to be kept refrigerated ... and can "go over" quit quickly.

I think the thing (as far as I'm concerned) with tv series is that the premise can be interesting, but after a season or two, wears thin. And then there's the waiting a year between seasons. When they finally roll in, it's a bit anticlimactic. It's not hard to pick up the thread. A quick trip to Wikipedia jogs my memory. I recently ran across a series in it's fourth season (how did I miss it) called "Elementary." Another Sherlock Holmes reimagining where Holmes is an English dude in modern NY City. Watson is a Chinese woman who used to be a surgeon, but, lost a patient and hasn't got past that, yet.

LOL. If I do get rid of my truck when I move to The Home, I wonder how that will go over with the Inmates? There's a good sized parking lot, out front, and it's stuffed full of vehicles. I'd say very few are carless. I may get some flack for being an "affront to other people's choices." :-).

I'm sorry your gathering was canceled. Man Flu, right? :-) Lew

W. B. Jorgenson said...

Lew,

That does sound like a Woody Allen quote. It wasn't my idea to share skills/knowledge, but I think it's a brilliant one as well. In any case, this is a big benefit to groups: other people often have ideas that wouldn't occur to me, and vice versa.

I wouldn't expect a new freezer to be very good either. But, well, I suppose you'll just have to see, right?

Chris,

Good luck with the clean up project! And yes, I'd be surprised if it didn't help keep things alive: there would definitely be enough dead things around for it to have an impact. However, it's very hard to test, barring getting incredibly unlucky...

Ah, in a well set up group, absolutely it's a responsibility. I find it feels more and more like one to me as time passes, however earlier in life, I didn't have this sense of noblese oblige I've acquired, and without it... Power trips can be quite fun at the time. Afterwards, however, the situation can be quite messy and painful. Steward is a good role to play, I think, provided the person is happy with it.

"Shut the suitcase" is an expression I like. The situation comes up often enough, so I think I'll have a chance to use it. I've never heard it before, but I think it should be clear enough what it means to others who've never heard it before, if no one else has.

Ah, I'm not saying everyone should be open, and I respect the decision not to speak about it. However, it does create an impression there are fewer people on the spectrum than there are. Yes, assistance is normally appreciated, as social cues go over our head a lot. I have a friend who has perfected a look no one else will see but I can easily catch that translates to "shut up, you're missing something obvious and making a fool of yourself. I'll explain later." And limits help. Given an indefinite amount of time to get something out of my system I will take a long time, but if a limit is imposed I can get it out faster. It helps to know how long I have, even if it's (usually) a self imposed limit.

Ah, yes, well, this happens a lot. I'm not the best at reading things not explicitly stated, although I'm much better in person. I've mostly shied away from social media and the like because of it. Most skills for in person don't translate well to text, but oh well. I'm sure I'll pick up a few things fairly quickly, and if I accidentally offend anyone, my apologies.

And the more I learn about how gifted programs work, the more I agree with that! However, the prestige they have makes it hard to see that clearly sometimes.

Well, then you truly are lucky. I've seen many people who can't absorb changes to their worldview in any context. And anonymity does interesting things to people. Some bad, some good: I'm more open about my less conventional views if I'm able to be a little anonymous. I also am really trying to keep an open mind and avoid letting my worldview solidify too much, since quite often in the past when my worldview hit reality the results were not pretty. I'd then adjust it, settle into a new one, and then eventually it would repeat.

It might be different now, since I'm working through things from both of JMG's blogs, and the other one, and the workings it hints at, are quite useful. Knowing oneself is a very good thing, and since I didn't know how to do it, but now have methods (Learning Ritual Magic is really useful), I figure it's possible things will work out better. And I appreciate the concern and I'm fully aware of the risks of depression, and taking steps to try to avoid it. However, my worldview shifted two ways, one bad (living in a declining civilization is less fun than one that is improving), and one good (replacing materialism with a magical viewpoint, giving more meaning to the world), and I think they cancel out in terms of emotional reaction.

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Margaret,

Yeah, the tomatoes really seem to split if a lot of rain falls. Sometimes here the splits can form a sort of scar tissue and they can end up being OK. It really needs some heat and dry to achieve that though. They do ripen off the plant don't they? I read somewhere long ago that the tomato fruit has developed its sugars already by the time they are green, but I'm not entirely sure that is true.

Thanks for that. Of course, long straw is a bit harder to keep clean. Sugar cane mulch is much finer and the chickens really have to work hard to kick it off their nesting boxes. Your story reminded me of the time I used pea straw... Not good. The wood shavings are a great idea and with the manure you'd end up with some choice soil additives. The dry leaves will add in some much needed nutrients. I'm not sure about your part of the world, but the humidity combined with the cold weather really knocks the birds around, so I try to keep their litter quite dry by turning it over most days. It only takes a minute or two. They always scratch it flat again!

Ha! A hard lesson learned, that one! I'd like to own a pig, but I suspect that the digging may cause some serious hassles due to the land being on a slope. My mates that have pigs are on a hill top which is fairly flat. Ah, flat land...

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi Lewis,

You know I've heard that firewood narrative before from plenty of other people up here. Rather than being a superiority thing, I think it maybe more an intellectual dishonesty thing? Dunno. I do know that it annoyed me no end, which I'm not sure was the guys intention. It was like he faced hillbilly country sensibilities from that of a city background and it sort of scared him to see his future. There is a story in there, I'm just trying to get my head around it, but it sure did annoy me - on my turf and to my face too. When I moved up here a lot of the old timers, whom I really like, said to me how much they hated the Greenies and I never dared correct them (what a social faux pas), but just wondered what they meant. I get it now... I may invoke the ghost of Wallace too tomorrow – hold onto your hat! Hehe!

Of course, weirdos are OK, but morons can be quite tiring. :-)! Dumb is forever, it just doesn’t get better with time. Showing a person the door sometimes is the appropriate response.

Yes, be careful of how hard the cores of those Quinces can be. Let's put it this way, the cores don't soften with cooking. Oh yeah, you will be surprised at how solid and jelly like the spread will be. Lot’s of pectin. Tasty too.

Wow! Well there is a use for potato chips I'd never thought of. Fascinating. I often wonder - and sorry to be a total buzz kill - but how do they keep potato chips staying crunchy in a bag for so long? Curious minds are wondering! ;-)! It has been years since I ate potato chips. Mind you, I'm no paragon of healthy eating as the other night I had a pancake drizzled with maple syrup (probably imitation) with strawberry jam. Many years ago, I knew the guy that supplied that restaurant chain with that strawberry jam, he's a local bloke, but I stopped buying strawberries from him although they were very tasty because he could take the orders for supply, but not deliver on them or even communicate that there was a problem with supply. That isn’t a criticism, it is just something that I struggle dealing too.

Flour is a very strange product. Wheat seeds has a good quantity of oil and in the process of making flour, the oil has to be removed so that the flour doesn't quickly go rancid. That is the problem. The downside is that once you remove the oil and I have no idea how that happens, the flour loses nutritional value. I didn't mention that the lovely bread ladies appear to have supplied me flour that wasn't labelled correctly and for a moment in time of a few weeks, I got to enjoy the flour that is more readily available rather than my more usual variety which is more expensive. They call that bait and switch. I had no idea how different that stuff was as I had not cooked with it before. It even felt different to the touch than my usual stuff. You know I don't really wonder now why there has been such an increase in the numbers of people reporting gluten intolerance in the community. The quality of our food systems are declining before our eyes and few people seem to even notice.

cont...

Cherokee Organics said...

Hey, you know I read recently about how the Aboriginals used to make their alcohol. They used to collect water in hollowed logs on their sides. Then during spring and summer, the log was covered over (possibly with a thick bark lid) and they would collect every single wildflower containing pollen and nectar and add them to the stored water in the log. After a few weeks and/or months the summer sun would facilitate fermentation. How cool is that? I planted a native edible nut tree (Bunya nut) today which is closely related to the monkey puzzle trees down in South America.

Fair enough, it is hard to keep momentum and as you quite rightly pointed out a few weeks back there are only so many stories that are acceptable to the population. JMG is doing wonders on that front. I do wonder how they don't disappear under the collective weight of all of the trauma on the characters. Or do you reckon people may view the stories like a video game in that there is a sort of reset and return to normal going on every now and then? Dunno. I've seen comedians descend into nastiness and a sort of vitriolic humour when they are pressed to deliver material consistently. It is a tough gig.

Well, if you get rid of the truck at the oldies home, then be prepared for a proper old school stoning. Remember to not mention Jehovah (Monty Python and the Holy Grail joke alert!) too whilst you are at it. You may inspire others to also ditch their trucks and you know what? You may even start a walking club! Why is the car park at the front? When I was a kid car parks were at the back and the shop was at the front?

Cheers

Chris

Cherokee Organics said...

Hi W.B,

Yeah it is hard to test and there are definitely no certainties... But the clean up has to happen or else I do know what will happen. The past is a good guide to that one! It offends many peoples sensibilities though which is a real shame. You would think that we would have learned about the country down here after such a long occupation, but still we view our lived experience as being a separate activity to that of nature, and of course it is worth dwelling upon the fact that we are required to do so in order to continue our present activities. Phew, where did that come from? ;-)! If it means anything to you, I try really hard to live consciously and that is rare nowadays because it come with costs.

Glad to read that you cottoned on to the noblese oblige because that means that you understand that you don't operate in isolation from other people and/or everything else on this planet. That can be quite an extraordinary leap of understanding and you appear to be taking it well. Steward is the role of the shaper, producer and leader. Everything else is a consumer.

Glad you like it. A good read into some of the marketing techniques employed against us all is a worthwhile use of your time. What do they say, to be forewarned, is to be forearmed? I recommend a book called: The Game by Neil Strauss. Neil is an interesting guy because he shares your analytical mindset and he breaks down interactions in a most brutal way. I'm not endorsing his activities, I'm just saying that we live in a world where all sorts of people use these techniques. I have friends that use those basic techniques and I give them a searching look and tell them to stop being an idiot. It defuses a lot of situations.

No, I reckon you missed it! Sorry mate. I will reiterate it to you bluntly for your benefit. My mother appeared to have many of the qualities of a spectrum disorder as she just didn't connect well - certainly not with me. I learned at an early age what those qualities where and then how to respond to them. For me that was a self defence thing as I sought to be out of the spot light where I'd otherwise get into trouble which was not good thing and could bring retribution. I see it in your writing which displays how you think. We give ourselves away in all sorts of subtle ways and I reckon it may be worth your time learning about the human condition and interactions and what it all means? Dunno, that is your call though as we each have to pick a way through life. I prefer many different stories.

Status is often used as tool against your best interests. I can't explain it to you any better than that as I have had it in the past and found it to be an ephemeral thing which is easily taken away. An education on the other hand is not easily taken away! ;-)!

Thanks. One week, that is the maximum it takes for me to absorb changes into my worldview. I rather suspect that this is a result of facing a whole lot of change in a short life... Dunno why though.

Yeah, the other blog should be good for you. Changes in consciousness doesn't seem to define whose consciousness you would want to change. As a suggestion, I reckon you are best starting with yourself and then leading by example. People are very alert to hypocrisy, although they are usually polite enough not to point it out. Plus meditation is worth its weight in gold. You may be surprised to learn than a lot of my work here at the farm is very meditative and I often get my best thoughts and ideas whilst busily digging away in the soil.

Cheers

Chris

Pam in Virginia said...

@ Inge:

Missed you, Inge. Remember my washing machine? The high-tech one, all computerized, that has driven me nuts? Well, it had gotten to where it was only working about half-way, and my son noticed that I was having a great deal of consternation in connection to it and asked if he might have a go at it. And he reminded me that with modern "smart" appliances that the diagnostics are computerized, too, so he fiddled with it and it "told" him what to reset and now it works as it originally did (yuk, but not as yuk). And he is a nice son and didn't say anything about what century are you in.

Pam

LewisLucanBooks said...

Yo, Chris - Hmm. What keeps potato chips crisp? Massive amounts of preservatives? (1.)

Well, the quince and casserole are on hold for a couple of days. Made a big 4 bean salad and oatmeal (2.) that I have to eat up before I embark on something else. So much food, so little time. :-). My late night eating habits can be a bit strange. I usually don't buy much ice cream (3.) but the pumpkin wasn't in for Halloween yet, I was miffed and picked up a quart of vanilla, just to strike back at "The Man." So there! Living alone has it's fringe benefits. I can ice ream right out of the carton with no grief! But the vanilla was a little dull, so I threw a bit of peanut butter and strawberry jam (4.) on top. Then I tried a bit of honey. Then, maple syrup. Finally screwed up my courage and got on the scale this morning (5.) First time since before the surgery.

I think (6.) gluten intolerance really is, in some cases, the result of the varieties of wheat used and milling process.

I think there was a craze for Monkey Puzzle trees, here in the Pacific Northwest, awhile back. I see, from time to time, an older home with an enormous Monkey Puzzle tree in the yard. The houses and trees always seem the same vintage. 1920s-30s.

Car parks seem to be plopped down, just about anywhere, here. What I want to know is why on hot days, you can never seem to find a place to park in the shade? :-). Lew

1.) More likely, because of all the salt ... and, they're air tight.
2.) I usually cut the oatmeal and fruit in half. So, I get two meals out of it.
3.) If it's not in the house, I don't eat it. Funny how that works.
4.) Re: Strawberry jam. I detect a theme, here.
5.) Well, not as bad as I thought. Still under 200 (just barely). Time to pull myself together and get with the program.
6.) I've read articles to that effect, several places. Of course, I know nothing about the author's credentials. Or agenda. Maybe they're in the pay of the organic grain board ... or something?